Holland's Theory Of Career Development

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Introduction Traditionally, career development theories have been widely used by career counsellors worldwide as a guide for individuals who struggles with finding a footing in their career path. Hansen (1976) defines career development as continuous lifelong process and experiences that focuses on seeking out and obtaining information regarding self, interest, passion, aptitude, occupational, and educational matters, life-styles and societal roles. Historically, career development theories are often influenced heavily and predetermined by the social and economic environment from which the theories are derived from. The fact is, career development theories reflect the economic realities of the context in which it existed (Bridges, 1995).…show more content…
Hence, the importance of job-fit, not just in terms of competence and aptitude, but also fit into departments, organizational culture, and teams. Basing on Holland’s theory, I would classify myself as a realistic individual, focusing on pragmatic approaches in life; in addition, I am also socially focused, and enjoys helping people. I envision myself being a perfect fit into the social service sectors. However, certain limitation applies to the theory, it fails to consider cross-cultural related issues in defining personality, and work environment. It is also assumes that we live in an ideal world where everyone can potentially fit into any work environment that is a fit with their personality. Most times, extraneous variables such as management style, colleague’s personality, work politics, and other undesirable issues such as pay, and career path may make ‘job fit’ a tough definition to make. In Singapore, opportunities are often not equal, and individual are much more money driven than they are interest driven; such an approach will make it difficult to find job…show more content…
Super argues that an individual’s self-concept is a by-product of complex interaction between factors such as mental and physical growth, personal anecdotal experiences, environmental and mental predisposition/characteristics. Opponents of Super’s theories have called for a stronger emphasis on the influence of social context and the reciprocal influence between the person and the environment. Savickas (2002), built on Super’s theory and posits that self-concept often works only as a guiding principles and are often dynamic-changing in accordance to the role and responsibilities that are expected from. Super (1990) also established the life-stage developmental framework with the following stages: (1) growth, (2) exploration, (3) establishment, (4) maintenance, and (5) disengagement. The theory posits that in each stage of life-stage developmental framework, one have to successfully manage the vocational tasks required for the specific age range.
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