How Did Alice Paul Contribute To The Women's Suffrage Movement

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The women’s suffrage movement paved the way for equal voting rights for all women throughout the twentieth century. Many strong and inspiring women fought for the rights that we now have today. One of them, including Alice Paul. Paul played a major role in pressuring Congress to pass the 19th amendment. Instead of sitting quietly in peaceful protests and campaigns, she refused to be a small voice in a sea of power-hungry men and oppressed women and made herself and women’s struggles known to America. She grabbed America’s attention through various tactics, including marches and picketing in front of the White House, and fought for equality until her death. As a young girl, Alice Paul had originally been introduced to the women’s suffrage movement through her mother, who would often take her to…show more content…
She brought every tactic and ideal she learned from the duo to America and applied them in the association. According to Sheridan Harveys’ article "Marching For the Vote: Remembering the Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913" from the Library of Congress, Paul convinced NAWSA to allow her to organize the Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913 and raised the funds for the parade herself. She strategically planned the march the day before President Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration to gain as much national attention as possible. On March 3, 1913, thousands of woman suffragists marched along Pennsylvania Avenue. Despite being verbally and physically attacked by those in opposition of women’s right to vote, the women marched on, demonstrating the lengths they will go to earn their rights. The women’s march forced the woman suffrage movement to be acknowledged and taken seriously by Americans, specifically Congress. The source provided proved most useful in gaining the information discussed because it contained the most information of the event and provided multiple sources as

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