How Did Earl Warren Affect Segregation

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Many historians credit Earl Warren for being one of the first Supreme Court Justice’s that took a stance against segregation but other historians would differ with the fact that Warren’s efforts affected segregation only to a certain extent. His efforts led to other civil rights movements but his and the court’s decisions did not directly change segregation because schools were still very segregated. Because, Chief Justice Warren presided over the court that overturned the decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, and thereby ended legal segregation, he should be credited with helping to put an end to segregation, at least to a certain degree. However, the results of the Brown v. Board case really only set the stage for the Civil Rights Movement to begin, …show more content…

Ferguson, Jim Crow upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities “as long as equal accommodations are made for each race” (Wexler 29), a doctrine that came to be known as "separate but equal.”Earl Warren was a Republican from California. He was appointed Chief Justice by Eisenhower to be his replacement in 1953. Warren stated that it was his goal to make fairness the base of American justice (Warren Court). Chief Justice Warren's involvement with segregation during the 1950s was rather prevalent and known. Earl Warren did not completely end segregation, but his effort to eradicate segregated schools with the court case Brown v. Board, Brown was only to apply to segregation in schools but it went beyond state permitted segregation. Many historians would disagree with this statement because of previous associations established prior to Chief Justice Warren ,for example, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) which was largely associated with helping African American plaintiffs bring desegregation lawsuits against school districts (Wexler 31). The NAACP's efforts are what allowed Brown to …show more content…

In the years following the decision, the Supreme Court struck down segregation of transportation, public buildings, housing, recreational facilities, and restaurants (“Meaning of Brown”). The Civil Rights Movement was heavily tied in with desegregation and historian Richard Kluger stated in Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America’s that “This is not to say that Brown began the movement—its heritage in the black community was largely separate from the doings of the Supreme Court. But the decision left an indelible mark on the direction and shape of the movement, especially in its early stages” the Brown movement further propelled civil rights movements and boycotts concerning segregation but it did not directly address issues that began to arise because of civil disobedient acts. The new precedent that Brown had set allowed African Americans to begin to take a stance against now overturned Jim Crow laws and social standards. This was all made possible because of the Warren Court's decision but it is important to understand that it was not aided by the Supreme Court. The movement had just been started because of it. Civil rights concerning segregation were more aided by the NAACP which in times of need, for example, the Montgomery

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