How Did Franklin D Roosevelt Contribute To America's Hope

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Franklin D. Roosevelt
America’s Hope

Franklin D. Roosevelt once said, “When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.” which is what many people did in the time Roosevelt was in office. People were “hanging onto the ends of their ropes” during World War II, which is when people needed faith that loved ones would come back from war and everything would be alright. Franklin D. Roosevelt changed the world by showing that people with disabilities can be something great. He gave people hope during World War II when people needed reassurance that everything would be alright. In a time of need, when not many people had jobs, he started agencies that gave people jobs to support their families. He left a legacy as being America’s hope. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s background was very affluent. In Franklin’s early years, he was born on
January 30, 1882 as an only child, although he did have a half-brother. Franklin was a distant cousin of the former president, President Theodore Roosevelt. At age five, Franklin met President Cleveland who said he wished that Franklin would not become president when he was older(Schuman 13-15). Franklin got all of the attention until age 14, when he left to go to school. The first school Franklin attended classes and lived at was called Groton School, located in
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Roosevelt left a legacy as America’s hope. In a time of need, when not many people had jobs, he started agencies that allowed people to get jobs to help support their families. He gave people hope during World War II when people need reassurance that everything would be alright. Franklin D. Roosevelt changed the world by proving that people with disabilities can be something great. He is certainly a hero of change because he guided the US through its ordeals that it had during the time Roosevelt was in office. Perhaps if people were more like Franklin D. Roosevelt, the world would be a more hopeful and peaceful place. Roosevelt was truly America’s
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