How Did Frederick Douglass Fight For Equality

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The definition of equality is "the state of being equal, especially in status, rights, and opportunities"(Oxford Dictionary). Due to the practice of slavery during the 1800s, obtaining equality for everyone was a hard goal to reach. By 1860, the number of slaves in the United States reached approximately four million (Statistics of Slaves). The abolition movement started, and both free and enslaved blacks, and even some whites, worked toward the emancipation of all slaves; the fight for equality began. One of the most famous abolitionists was Frederick Douglass. He was once a part of that large number of slaves, but later escaped. He became one of the greatest writers and speakers against slavery. Douglass spoke to many audiences and …show more content…

The events that occurred when he was growing up had impacted him and influenced him to become a great speaker, writer, and advocate for others. The first incident that inspired him was when he was at the Auld family's house working as a servant. Sophia Auld read the Bible out loud and hearing her, Douglass asked her to teach him how to read. Her husband saw this and immediately made her stop because "it was unlawful to teach a slave to read, and Auld believed that keeping slaves from reading and writing was a way to maintain power over them" (Reconstruction Era Reference Library). Douglass overheard this and believed that if he continued to learn, he would eventually reach freedom. At this moment in Douglass' life, he finally had hope. This was the first incident that geared him towards becoming a writer and lecturer. It motivated Douglass and made him determined to accomplish something. He understood what needed to be done. In 1841 when he went to an anti-slavery convention, this inspired him to be an author and activist. He was asked to speak in public, and although he was very nervous, he took up the challenge. When he finished giving his speech, he and many others recognized how good and encouraging he was. At this moment in time, Frederick Douglass realized that he was meant to become a speaker and writer. From that moment on, he continued to …show more content…

It was one of the most popular slave narratives of the time. Many people come to America because they want to be free and live out their dream, but as written in the title, An American Slave, contradicts what it means to be an American. As said in the introduction of the Narrative, "'American' and 'Slave', writes James Olney, are 'yoked by violence together, and they present the most radical, the most aggressive, the most thoroughgoing challenge imaginable to the very idea of the American nation and to the Declaration of Independence'" (Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass). Also, the New York Tribune specifically pointed out the bravery of Douglass, they wrote, "He has had the courage to name the persons, times and places, thus exposing himself to obvious danger" (Documenting the American South). Douglass knew that he could come into extreme danger by publishing his Narrative. He could possibly be caught and sold back into slavery again, but he published it anyway for his fellow slaves. Douglass wanted to reach out to the public and tell them what is really happening in slavery. A lot of the people at the time did not know how bad slavery was. As said in an article from the New York Tribune, "Like a man who has been in the habit of screaming himself hoarse to make the deaf hear. . ." ( Documenting the American

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