How Did Gatsby Achieve The American Dream

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Jay Gatsby grew up as a child in poverty in North Dakota. After being taken under Dan Cody’s wing, as his personal assistant, Jay realized that he wanted to achieve the american dream, Just like Mr. Cody. Gatsby wanted to become wealthy and successful. When Daisy appears in Gatsby’s life, she reflects perfection and the american dream. Gatsby had planned to marry Daisy but when he returned from the war she had gone and married Tom. She symbolized everything that he craved, Gatsby needed to get Daisy back into his life in order to achieve his dream. Daisy is the girl that Gatsby feels completes his life. After being shipped to war, Gatsby regretted it every second because it set him and Daisy apart. After the war when Gatsby went to Oxford, she did not wait for Gatsby like he had waited for her. His letters to her were not enough to keep her waiting. This lead to Daisy falling in love for Tom Buchanan, not only for his looks but for his wealth. Even though Gatsby knew Daisy was no longer his, he looked for Daisy everyday. This inspired him even more to pursue his dream to become successful and wealthy to win Daisy back. After this Gatsby spends his life doing nothing but trying to earn as much money as possible.…show more content…
Gatsby was blindsided in his attempt to achieve his american dream. He forgot to focus on his family, making himself happy, or even making friends. In the end Daisy ended up leaving Gatsby for Tom again. His american dream could not come true because it was all an illusion. Daisy never had and never would love Gatsby as much as he loved her. The day that Gatsby died showed how invested he was on winning Daisy back. He had no friends to attend his funeral except Nick, the postman, his dad, owl eyes, and a few of his servants. The so called “love of his life” didn’t even show up to his funeral. This shows how one person can become so focused on an imaginary reality/dream that they forget to focus on the present, and make their life worth living in the
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