Why Did Germany Lost World War One?

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Germany after World War 1 would never be the same. Germany lost World War and resulted in their country beginning to fall apart mostly impacting the economy. Germany was angry and embarrassed having lost the war but what impacted them the most was the terms of the Treaty of Versailles that destroyed Germany’s economy. The Treaty of Versailles imposed reparations from the war leaving Germany with huge debts. “The situation was made worse by economic problems created by crippling war debts,the burden of having to pay reparations, and high unemployment.” The Treaty of Versailles said that Germany must pay reparations to the other countries which left them in debt because Germany no longer had any money and it eventually led them into hyperinflation…show more content…
Hitler was given minor opportunities in power. “Some Nazis, led by Gregor Strasser, the most prominent socialist-minded member in the party grew impatient and urged Hitler to exploit the unstable political situation by directing the SA to overthrow the government and take power by force.” Hitler rejected the offer to overthrow the government, he then was asked by by Hindenburg to serve as Vice-Chancellor under Von Papen. Hitler also refused this offer saying, “He wanted the Chancellorship and calculated that as the leader of the largest single party that prize could not long be denied him.” Hitler had confidence that he could become Chancellor of Germany without any of the two opportunities offered to him. He felt that because he was the leader of the Nazis that he would win and that no one could deny him as opportunity as Chancellor. Hitler and the Nazis gained a large amount of support and Hitler stood behind the scenes in politics and kept his hands clean which was very wise and worked to his advantage. Every move that Hitler made was a strategic and planned out ahead of time. Though some moves weren’t successful most of them gave him an advantage and strengthen his power as he began to rise as the next leader of
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