How Did Hank Williams Contribute To Music

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Hank Williams became one of America's first country music superstars and father of contemporary country music at age of 25. Williams like any other musician in history greatly contributed to the music industry and inspired many country musicians back in his days and after he died. As a talented music legend, he created and established standard rules for all upcoming country musicians and performers who followed his footsteps. Music they say; is the food for the soul and medication for a lonely heart. Music “frequencies seem to overpower our neurological impulses that make us feel at a lightened state of excitement without taking any mind altering substances, or medication to change our social and emotional state of being rather than a state …show more content…

Hiram grew with his mother as a child, due to separation between his father and mother. As a child, he spent most of his childhood in Georgiana and Greenville, Alabama, and became captivated by music by playing harmonica, learning the organ from his mother, and acquiring his first guitar at the age eight. Williams' passion and inspiration were further influenced by his friendship singer Rufus "Tee Tot" Payne an African American street singer, who helped Williams sharpen his guitar skills and, more significantly, develop the blues phrasing and blues rhythms that he would later use in his own singing style. “Like many other young boys growing up in the South at the time, Williams was a fan of singer Jimmie Rodgers, a Mississippian whose groundbreaking music blended blues guitar, evocative yodeling, and vivid lyrical imagery.” In 1937, Hank Williams and his mother, Lillie Williams relocated to the capital city of Montgomery, where Lillie his mother opened a boarding …show more content…

In a remarkable way, Williams' life quickly changed. His recognition by fans fetch him more money and gave him the kind of creative freedom artists long for and fame. “By the end of 1951, Williams had amassed 24 top 10 singles, with six reaching number one. In addition to success on the country charts, he also became a favored song source for such pop singers as Frankie Laine, Jo Stafford, Guy Mitchell, and, most notably, Tony Bennett, whose recording of "Cold, Cold Heart" reached number one on the pop charts in 1951.” Williams’ health problem was becoming a big deal for him; he suffered a minor heart attack while visiting his sister in Florida. Seeking aids for back pain, increase his substance abuse and dependence on alcohol and morphine usage. Opry fired Williams in 1952 and Sheppard his wife divorced him. This affected his physical appearance; His hair began falling out, and he put on extra pounds in weight. He collapsed in a hotel room in Knoxville, Tennessee in which a doctor was invited to his

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