Jackie Robinson's Role In Major League Baseball

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Civil rights is defined as the rights of citizens to political and social freedom and equality. But during the civil rights movement, people of a certain color were discriminated against and didn’t have civil rights. The whites were biased and treated African Americans with disrespect. This was because whites feared that colored people would overthrow the whites so out of fear, the whites treated the blacks brutally. Jackie Robinson was one of many African Americans to protest against these conditions. He broke the color barrier and began the desegregation process in Major League Baseball. Although he had tough times while playing in Major League baseball, he was determined to break racial barriers all over the nation. Jackie Robinson impacted…show more content…
After Branch Rickey, Dodgers general manager signed the black baseball player, Jackie Robinson inspired many of his teammates to urge desegregation in Southern public places. After Robinson retired from the Major Leagues, he continued to fight against racial discrimination and worked to remove the racial barriers. He wrote letters to every president in office from 1956 to 1972.(“Jackie Robinson”/History.com) In the letters, Robinson criticized how slowed the integration process was for the Major League Baseball. They expressed his disappointment for not going far enough to advance the Civil Rights motive. He sent the message that racial integration would improve every aspect of American society. Robinson measured the president’s performance based on his dedication to the civil rights. In one of his letters he wrote that, “Negroes can’t wait for the heart of men to change”.(“A Letter From Jackie Robinson: Civil Rights Advocate”) This meant that African American men and women cannot wait for white men and women to begin to change the way they feel and beliefs about black men and
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