How Did Lincoln's Plan For Reconstruction

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After the war, plans began to swarm the nation on repairing the Union and Confederate states. Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, and Congress all had different ambitions for the United States to meet. Though all can 't be fixed with one solution, as for not everything may be broken by a weakness. In 1863, President Lincoln was determined for reunification. Although Lincoln concentrated on his plans for Reconstruction, he didn 't apply much diligence towards the Southern properties that were lost due to technical tax evasion. Abraham Lincoln 's plan proposed land be given to Emancipation accepting "rebels", but Confederate officers and people highly involved in their government, would be closed out from this proposition. Lincoln also granted that if ten percent of the state 's majority (of those who could vote), they 'd be allowed to make a new government. This last proposition caused the North anxiety for it could allow the South to receive unneeded power, causing the original split between the regions once again.…show more content…
Very soon after Lincoln died, and his Vice President Andrew Johnson was placed into presidency. The summer of 1865, Johnson focused on another plan for reconstruction without help and opinions from Congress. When Johnson invited people to read his course of action for reconstruction, he was the laugh of the South, and many state governments began to evade the laws. Thus, created Black Codes, which gave White Southerner 's supremacy to newly freed slaves. The Black Codes denied blacks availability to guns, insulting language (or blasphemy) illegal, and barred blacks from voting. In Mississippi, blacks were even subject to plantation work if they could not prove their employment. Andrew Johnson allowed this behavior and even vetoed a bill that would 've denied his right to. Proving the ultimate weakness of the reconstruction plans. In response, the Republican Congress was able to override Andrew 's vetoes for once, and the pass laws for civil
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