How Did Society Realize Bigger's Native Son?

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main character, Bigger, is introduced to readers as a typical black boy growing up in poverty in the slums of southside Chicago. One of the biggest questions you have to ask yourself when reading Native Son is: Did society push Bigger to become the person he is? The answer is yes, society basically forced Bigger to think the way he did by what it offered him. Early on in the novel, Wright introduces this ideal with the use of education. On page 17 of the novel, Bigger and his friend Gus discuss Bigger’s dream of attending flight school and obtaining a license for flying planes. Gus then reminds Bigger that aviation school isn’t for them, black kids, but rather it is for the whites. After Bigger has this conversation with Gus, he meets his future …show more content…

It proves that maybe, this common myth has more faults to it than acknowledged. After discovering this observation, the authors of The Public School Advantage introduced a new type of examination that will improve the research study by using the examination to track the differences between kindergarten students in private and public school systems. It is captivating to project all of the different results that can potentially be produced with the commencement and continuation of this new examination strategy because it is providing a way for more recent and extensive research . Although the Lubienski’s have taken the time to invest into this research movement, it will take more than just their actions to gain nation understanding and …show more content…

One thing that almost all Americans take for granted is their privilege. As argued by both Gay and Gladwell, success is determined by more than just hard work and dedication. This social injustice is based on the ideal that private school students have more natural ability to reach success, while the public school students to do not have the ability to meet the requirements of private school education because of their mental capacity. This ideal is completely untrue. Private schools have the fundamentals to provide their students with such rigorous and beneficiary education because of the private and public donors that provide them with the money to afford the cost for these things. On the other hand, public schools depend directly on public and government aid. Because of this fact, there is a split between city public schools and suburban city schools. Most city public school systems just do not have the support of their communities to grant their students with higher education. To conclude, it can be argued that if these public school students fighting this social injustice were provided with the same opportunities of their private school counterparts at young ages, they would excel as much or even more than those privileged do now. “Things are not always what they seem; the first appearance

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