How Did The First World War Affect Canada

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The first world war was a destructive deathly conflict, which killed thousands of Canadian men while altering Canada 's society forever, but it was also a unifying and altering conflict, changing the definition of Canadian forever. World war one unified this country, but at the same time grieved and divided its people. Canada entered the war just as a mere British colony and came out as an incredible fighting force led by one of its own men. 619,636 men and women entered to fight for their country, having only 1 out of every 10 return. Although tragic, Canada 's war effort won a separate signature on the Peace Treaty. This gave Canada the constantly wanted national status, it gave to Canadians nationhood. Although proud of their autonomy, Canada 's economic situation was terrible. Before the war, Canada 's debt was already rising, because of the loss in wheat crops and the loss of jobs due to the railway. After the war ended, Canada 's economy did not get better. Because of the war, Canada had to pay $164 million per year to pay off their debt. In result, the modern day income tax was put in place. Over all, Canada 's total debt reached $1,665,576,000…show more content…
"Canada entered World War I as a colony and came out a nation..." (Bruce Huchison). Canada suffered many deaths and struggles from the first world war. They rushed in voluntarily, not expecting the bloodshed and the pain, in return experiencing death, pursued by a fall in economy, job loss, and a somewhat divided nation. But, despite of the clear negative effects of this war, Canada obtained its deserved autonomy. Before this conflict, Canada was nothing but a small British colony, living under the control of England, incapable to be brave and victorious. After this war, Canada came out as a bright and strong nation of its own; it received its own signature in the Peace Court, more autonomy from England, and the unification of all Canadians. At that moment of victory, every soldier was for once, proud to be
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