How Did The Tweed Ring's Existence

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The Tweed Ring’s existence came into light between 1866 and 1871, and it begins when William ‘The Boss’ Tweed and his company made it so that all bills to the city would be at least fifty percent fraudulent, later raised to eighty five percent. The affluence went to William ‘The Boss’ Tweed, the city financial officer, the county treasurer, and the mayor. Furthermore, twenty percent of the share would go into bribing officials and businessmen, which led to a diverse following; William ‘The Boss’ Tweed loved to keep them around, and in order to maintain this regime, he ‘provided for all’. Unfortunately, Tweed was very sufficient in keeping up this scam, by fooling even the ‘best’ people by using his silver tongue and having a controllable idiosyncrasy. Being the amazing nineteenth-century…show more content…
For instance, he once turned a four million dollar courthouse into a twelve million dollar courthouse through fraudulence. The Tweed Ring became exposed with the help of city patricians, The New York Times, and assorted political enemies within both parties, with varying motives. When The Tweed Ring was exposed, New York estimated William ‘The Boss’ Tweed’s services costed them somewhere between forty million dollars and one hundred million dollars. Initially, Tweed and his associates were sentenced to prison for twelve years, yet were released in 1875. Later on, William ‘The Boss’ Tweed would find himself in another jail cell, due to later charges, dead on April 12, 1878. The Crédit Mobilier of America, a predicament of malfeasance in the Gilded Age. In 1862, Congress chartered the Union Pacific Railroad with a federal compromise for a transcontinental railroad. During this time, Congress also, established the Crédit Mobilier, a sundered corporation for the railroad’s construction, to attract private investors, leading to tremendous profit. Fortunately, for
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