How Does Antony Use Ethos In Julius Caesar

672 Words3 Pages

In William Shakespeare’s play, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Roman conspirators assassinate Julius Caesar, since they believed that he was becoming a tyrant and crazy with power. They were able to explain their actions to the crowd and why it was the right thing to do. However, Antony persuades the crowd into turning against the conspirators. Antony is effective is swaying the crowd by implementing ethos, pathos, and logos in his funeral oration In order to persuade the crowd into believing his intentions, Antony displays the use of ethos, which explains how he is a credible and plausible person. In the beginning of the speech, Antony tells the crowd that Caesar “was my friend, faithful and just to me (III, ii, 87).” Antony demonstrates that …show more content…

Antony interrupts his speech to lament since his “heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, and I must pause until it come back to me (III, ii, 108-109).” Antony illustrates his love for Caesar by shedding tears, which sways the mob into thinking how much he cares for Caesar. The crowd is fickle and begins to side with Antony as they sympathize for him. Before Antony reads the will, he shows verbal irony when he declares, “O masters! If I were disposed to stir your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong-Who, you all know, are honorable men (III, ii, 123-125).” Antony appeals to the crowd’s feelings by sarcastically saying that Brutus and Cassius were honorable men, but he really means that they were wicked and unethical. Through the implementation of pathos in his oration, Antony is able to use the crowd’s feelings to his …show more content…

Antony shuts down any belief that Caesar was ambitious, since “he hath brought many captives home to Rome, whose ransoms did the general coffers fill; Did this in Caesar seem ambitious (III, ii, 90-92).” This shows that it is reasonable to believe that Caesar was not ambitious, since he works hard to make sure the wealth from ransoms were shared with Rome. Furthermore, he explains how Caesar has no motive for power, since he was “thrice presented him a kingly crown, which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition (III, ii, 98-100).” This demonstrates that it is logical for plebeians to believe that Caesar was not hungry for power, since he declined the chance for power three times. By using the ability of logic and reason, Antony is effective in swaying the crowd into accepting the fact that Caesar was a righteous and unselfish

Open Document