How Does Aunt Clara Use Prostitution In Macbeth

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To sum it up, the witches and the prostitutes shares some similarities. For an example, they both are not welcomed into society this indicates they are outcasts, as well as this both the witches and the prostitutes strives to manipulative other characters into they trap this is shown clearly in Macbeth. When one of the witches’ quote “(Second Witch) All Hail, Macbeth, hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor!... ( the third witch) All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be king hereafter!", the outcome of this is that the Witches were gaining Macbeth's hope in becoming King. This impacted Lady Macbeth into building her ambitions to become a queen, so she forced Macbeth to kill King Duncan as she supported the witches view, further along, the story it came to show what the consequences of…show more content…
This woman is not in the novel as she is presented dead but she is remembered by George and Lennie as she appears in Lennie’s daydreams. Aunt Clara showed the motherly figure as she was Lennie's caretaker but treated him like a son, this is backed up by the following quotation." you never give a thought to George", in this quote she is telling Lennie off in much the same way a mother would do. This denotes the affection she had for Lennie. Linking it up she is a maternal and generous lady, she gave love to Lennie as he is her son.
In summary, Lady Macduff and Aunt Clara pose similar roles as they both show motherly figures. As Lady Macduff is only contributed to taking care of her child. As well as Aunt Clara, which she was supporting Lennie like a mother to a son. The differences they both have is that Lady Macduff is braver, she is a victim of her husband's choice. whereas Aunt Clara has the dignity to take care of ill people such as Lennie. Equally important they both are positive inspiration for

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