How Does Grant Use Jomini's Concept Of Interior Lines?

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Question 1: General Ulysses S. Grant was renowned as an extremely aggressive general who did what had to be done to get the job done. Grant was charged with commanding the entiretyof the Union army; a massive responsibility, to be sure, and took the offensive time and again, leveraging Union resources and numbers to simply overwhelm the Confederacy and claim victory (Weigley, The American Way of War, pg.130). This aggression meant striking at the heart of the Confederate strongholds, forcing Grant and his armies to make difficult presses through extremely heavy resistance, while also ensuring that the Union maintained the material advantage. With this in mind, the primary thesis is that Grant's war-fighting style is more in line with Jomini, …show more content…

The concept of interior lines was simple. According to one source, interior lines dictates that "the side that is surrounded by the enemy is better off than the side which surrounds its opponent, especially with equal or even weaker forces" (Bassford, Jomini and Clausewitz: Their Interaction, pg. 3-4). This basic strategy hinges on the surrounded army having access to a geometric advantage by having access to all parts of the opponents army at all times, as well as providing a morale boost for the army, in the worst case scenario (Jomini, The Art of War, pg.65-67). Grant utilized this concept by continually finding himself surrounded by the enemy, although this was not, strictly speaking, intentional, but was merely a consequence of his aggressive commanding style, which often found him and his armies surrounded, allowing him to take advantage of Jomini's …show more content…

There were primitive tanks utilized in World War I, but it was not until after the war that Germany, among many others, began researching tank prototypes, such as the Char B battle tank, which found a balance between speed and firepower (Paret et al, Makers of Modern... pg.610). What is perhaps more important, however, is not the actual technology behind the tank, but the concept of the tank itself. The tank, of course, is designed to be a powerhouse, capable of plowing through enemy defenses, attacking at long range, or any number of other tasks. The increasingly drawn out warfare in World War I necessitated a crude tool that would allow for the kind of warfare that the tank brings, which is slow, cumbersome, yet effective, combat. Obviously, this concept has withstood the test of time, and remains a practical tool of war, even in the modern era. The United States now widely utilized and implements tanks, especially the M1 Abrams tank, among many other variants, which focus on things like anti-infantry capabilities. It is likely that, had the Germans not perfected the tank in World War I and World War II, the United States would not be using tanks

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