How Does Hester Prynne Deserve His Punishment

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In Nathaniel Hawthorne 's Novel, The Scarlet Letter, Hester Prynne is punished for committing the crime of adultery. Hester must wear the letter "A" upon her bosom to represent the adultery she has committed with Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale. It is argued whether Hester is the culprit of her crime or if she has fallen victim of it. Early on in Hester 's life she becomes a victim when she is forced into an arranged marriage. Her parents arrange her to marry Roger Chillingworth, a wealthy yet infamous man. Roger Chillingworth was a man who valued possessions and Hester become nothing more than that to him. He was able to do what he wanted and go wherever he wanted due to his wealth. Roger lived many different lives leading him to abandon…show more content…
QUOTE Arthur and Hester dreamt of running away and creating a life together. They finally devised a plan to get away and start their life together, where no one could judge them for their actions. Arthur announces to the community his involvement with Hester Prynne. He stands up proud, the community holding him high in the their opinions, and confesses his sin. He soon falls to his illness and dies after admitting his involvement with Hester Prynne. Her obsessive love for Arthur ultimately broke her heart and robbed Pearl of her innocence. This love caused Pearl to lose her freedom that only youth can provide. Therefore, to answer the question of whether Hester is the culprit of her crime or whether she is a victim of it is answered; she has shown characteristics of both. Her behavior repeatedly displayed that the stigma of the scarlet letter fueled her but she also fell victim to its effect. The views of Hester 's personality change as the novel progresses. Many think that under no circumstances may anyone break the commandments of the Lord ergo that could prove Hester 's infidelity. Nonetheless, her crime could also be viewed as one of passion and love for another human. Hester 's is both a culprit and a victim of her crime, seeing the good and the
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