How Does King Arthur Radley Symbolize In To Kill A Mockingbird

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“Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy . . . but sing their hearts out for us. That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.” In the novel, it seems to mention so many metaphors between mockingbirds and the characters. How it indicates that there is a reason for those characters to be symbolized by a mockingbird. The novel is about how a young girl named Scout Finch, 7, and her older brother Jem Finch, who live in a small Southern town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the Depression, spend most of their time with their friend Dill spying on their neighbor Boo Radley. When their father, Atticus takes a case that will change his life and expose to the children the evil of racism and in people. In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, there are numerous characters who are symbolized as the mockingbird in the story. In the novel, it seems as though…show more content…
Arthur Radley is a innocent, sweet, and giving man who lives across the street from the Finch’s. Boo, Arthur, is seen as a murder, creep, and weirdo. Bad rumours go around town about Boo. Boo would give Scout and Jem gifts in the tree. This shows that he had a love for children. In the novel, it seems a mockingbird is something that does no wrong to others and yet is helpless and tends to get abused by others. That is exactly what Boo was in the beginning of the novel. He has never hurt anyone outside his family, but people still seem to make him look like a monster.The author of To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee, asserts, “‘Bob Ewell’s lyin’ on the ground under that tree down yonder with a kitchen knife stuck up under his ribs. He’s dead, Mr. Finch’” 266. When Scout and Jem were being attacked by Bob Ewell, Boo then accidently stabbed Bob to save the children. That was when Boo’s innocence was ruined because he no longer fits the definition of a mockingbird, even though it was an
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