How Does Martin Luther King Use Repetition In I Have A Dream Speech

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Martin Luther King’s speech about equality throughout the world, and his hope for humanity has been recognized as one of the most brilliant and memorable speeches of all time. It is a powerful message against all forms of racism. King starts off by painting a picture of how much the African American race has struggled for their freedom. He continues by saying how even though they are no longer slaves, they still do not have the rights that every human being deserves. This speech also informs the audience on what they plan to do to obtain their rights. Mr. King clearly states that their plan is not to fight with violence, but with love. "We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise…show more content…
In the beginning of this speech King repeats the phrase “One hundred years later,”(I Have a Dream). When saying this, Martin Luther King is telling the people that one hundred years ago they were struggling to obtain freedom. The repetition of that phrase shows emphasis on the many things that the African American race went through. Another more memorable section of the speech in which repetition is used is towards the end. The famous words in which King states “I have a dream!” demonstrate the whole idea behind the message. He says he has a dream, he hopes, he aspires for a better future in which everyone is treated equally. That is the message that people are left with. By repeating simple phrases like “I have a dream” and “we cannot” King sings a passionate song about the desire for freedom and the fight to obtain the dream that lies within his heart. Martin Luther King tells his audience that after freedom is allowed to ring wonderful things will happen. Dr. King finishes off with a compelling use of repetition that fills the hearts of everyone who reads it or listens to it with hope. He proclaims the words that he hopes will be sung when the war for civil rights is over. "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at
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