How Does Orwell Use Dramatic Irony In Animal Farm

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"Death is the solution to all problems. No man - no problem."- Joseph Stalin. In George Orwell 's Animal Farm, Orwell expresses his abhorrence towards the Russian Revolution in his allegorical and satirical novella with talking animals. After a pig named Old Major convinces the animals to rebel against Man, their primary problem, the animals take over Manor Farm. Although the other animals recognize the pigs as the intelligent, dominant leaders of the farm, the pigs quickly corrupt the ideals of Animalism to a dictatorship, which includes reduced rations, murders, and corruption. As the pigs distinguish themselves from the other animals and break the commandments, oppression and starvation seem to stare the working-class animals in their…show more content…
He supplied them the proper education needed to develop on the farm. However, he taught them to fight for a false cause: himself. Parallel to Stalin during the Russian Revolution, Napoleon is aware the other animals are starting to recognize the abuse of his dictatorship; he immediately selects these nine dogs as his guard dogs, or the KGB during the Russian Revolution. With their fierce looks and menacing growls, the dogs engender fear into the others as they confess to false crimes and perpetually die. Orwell 's use of dramatic irony fits perfectly with Animal Farm, as the dogs do not realize they are causing the farm animals ' oppression to grow exponentially. Napoleon indoctrinated them innately to fight for him. In turn, the dogs brainwash the farm animals to support Napoleon and influence the way the animals act toward both the pigs and the dogs. Although most animals on the farm "work to their capacity (pg 29)," the dogs do not work, and instead they eat and protect Napoleon without hesitation. Napoleon slowly turns the dogs from a form of labor to a form of tyranny. Every step toward Napoleon 's totalitarianism is one step further from the farm animals '
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