How Does Orwell Use Situational Irony In 1984

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The use of irony is frequently incorporated in works of literature, often to emphasize an opposite effect. The novel, 1984, by George Orwell, engages both its characters as well as groups to utilize literary devices, such as irony, to deceive others for their own benefit. One of these groups is made up of the highest ranked government officials within Eurasia (the setting of the novel), called the Inner Party. The Inner Party controls nearly everything in Eurasia, from the news to public buildings, allowing them to integrate their own ideas and ways of living. The method in which they do so, as well as the actions of characters in 1984, are shown by ironic events throughout the novel. The use of dramatic irony, where the audience understands …show more content…

Winston feels as if he has trust in O’Brien, as if he “could talk to [O’Brien], if somehow you could cheat the telescreen and get him alone” (Orwell, 11). The story later tells that O’Brien pretends to be part of a revolutionary group called The Brotherhood and recruits Winston and Julia. The situational irony in this relationship is that O’Brien is truly an Inner Party member, and has exposed Winston’s disloyalty to the Party, taking an unexpected turn in the wrong direction for Winston. However, what is also ironic, is that once imprisoned and under O’Brien’s custody, Winston still felt that “O’Brien was his protector” (Orwell, 250). The relationship between O’Brien and Winston transforms from trust in O’Brien, into pure dependency and a sense of safety in O’Brien, who both starts and stops the pain Winston received while in custody. Another ironic aspect is that Winston continues to trust O’Brien, even after he realizes that O’Brien is an enemy of his own beliefs. This is the start of Winston’s rebellious mindset to breakdown into a reformed mind of the …show more content…

The Inner Party’s objective to control all aspects of life was accomplished with “doublethink”, an ironic effect. As well as this, both Julia and O’Brien took unpredicted changes in personality, creating situational irony with the theme of switching roles, where friends become enemies and enemies become friends. The numerous instances of irony showed its key role in shaping the novel 1984 as it is. ien’s custody, Winston still felt that “O’Brien was his protector” (Orwell, 250). The relationship between O’Brien and Winston transforms from trust in O’Brien, into pure dependency and a sense of safety in O’Brien, who both starts and stops the pain Winston received while in custody. Another ironic aspect is that Winston continues to trust O’Brien, even after he realizes that O’Brien is an enemy of his own beliefs. This is the start of Winston’s rebellious mindset to breakdown into a reformed mind of the

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