How Does Ralph Fail In Lord Of The Flies

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The manner in which an individual deals with failure, is a true determinant of their character. In the novel, The Lord of the Flies, the three main characters have detrimental failures. The first member, Ralph, is the island leader, who fails to keep the boys together as one. The second member is Simon, who dies while attempting to tell the boys that there is no mythical beast. Jack, the third and final member, fails to become the island leader, igniting an endless spark in him. This constant spark is what leads to a pivotal moment in the novel. Nevertheless, each boy reacts differently to their failures, which shows how strong or weak they are. Only the strong survive, and the weak do not make it. Failure is in each of their journeys, and …show more content…

The first member that fails is Ralph. Ralph is the man of the island. He is the guy everyone looks to for resolutions. Taking this into account, when he fails, there will be many more failures behind him. He is persistent in attempting to keep the group together, it simply does not work out because’s Jack’s need for power takes over. The group's integrity can only last so long when there are dividing powers within, making this Ralph’s first absolute failure at the beginning of the novel. When Ralph states, “Jack’s in charge of the choir. They can be--- what do you want them to be?” (Golding 23). Jack replies with “Hunters”, Ralph now is starting to sense a bit of savageness in Jack’s blood (Golding 23). With this, Jack’s power-hungry mentality kicks into play. He loves this feeling of having his own group and control over it. Although, with Jack, all he has is a little bit of power, taking it and running a mile with it, resulting in Jack creating his own tribe. Jack claims, “I’m not going to play any longer. Not with you.” (Golding 127) it is now official these …show more content…

He more or less just wanders around the jungle, does his duties at camp, and listens to Ralph. While not bad practices, it does lead to his ultimate demise. Due to the fact, he is always in the jungle, the other boys believe there is a beast on the island. The boys believe this beast haunts them at night, however, Simon’s thoughts lead him to believe there is no beast. Simon proclaims, “maybe there is a beast” (Golding 89) speaking with questioning and unsurety. He then follows it up with “I don’t know” (Golding 89), which shows him being in his own world. His “decontextualization… splits off the activity from [his] social frame of reference and reduces [his] contact with reality” (“Apa”). This is the way Simon just is, he is a follower, but has a different mindset compared to others. His introverted nature stops him from getting any message out to others. He mumbles, confusedly, “I don’t believe in the beast” (Golding 105). This gets him nowhere among the boys, and he stays a follower. Since the boys are split up, Simon is the only one to believe there is no beast, and he dies attempting to preach there is no beast. Jack’s ruthless hunters attacked him when he was “crying out something about a dead man on a hill” (Golding 152). This shows Simon is a smart guy, but his lackadaisical attitude leads him to his demise, which ends up being his most significant failure, costing him his

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