How Does Steinbeck Show The Failing Dreams In Of Mice And Men

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How does Steinbeck show the failing dreams of all the main characters, and how easy their goals are shattered throughout the book? Throughout the book, Of Mice and Men, George and Lennie, two labor workers that are run out of their previous employment in Weed, find a ranch to work on in Salinas Valley California to fulfill their dreams of being rich and having their own farm. Salinas Valley is where they plan to stay until they have saved enough money to have their own ranch and move on. Besides the dreams George and Lennie have, many other people on the ranch have ones as well. While Steinbeck illustrates the journey the characters go through to achieve their dreams, their failed attempt occurs for numerous reasons. Throughout the book, …show more content…

One of the main characters George and Lennie run into during the book that has dreams for themselves is Curley’s wife. Curley’s wife, known as the flirtatious “tramp” or “tart,” by all the migrant workers has dreams in her life that are crushed by her husband and mother. Curley’s wife uses her physical appearance as a source of swaying for the other ranch workers. Although she seems to have a trashy first impression, there is more to her than just flirtatious behavior. Her ultimate dream was to be an actress in Hollywood, and pursue her acting career. Aside from Hollywood, she cannot even have a social life on the ranch let alone becoming an actress. “He says he was gonna put me in the movies. Says I was a natural. Soon’s he got back to Hollywood he was gonna write to me about it…I always thought my ol’ lady stole it” (Steinbeck 88). Curley’s wife is expressing the opportunity she had in life that was tarnished, and brought her to marrying Curley. Curley suppresses her from everything else she wants to do, blocking her from …show more content…

Due to Lennie’s mental disadvantage, George has felt responsible for him. Because of Lennie, the two of them had to flee their old town of Weed. Whatever dreams George has in mind, Lennie is a part of. George has come to admit that to himself. George recognizes that Lennie is dependent on him. “I want you to stay with me, Lennie. Jesus Christ, somebody’d shoot you for a coyote if you was by yourself” (Steinbeck 13). George views his dream of being super practical for the kind of life he lives. Living on his own ranch with Lennie will let him have less of a worry about Lennie making decisions that will put the both of them in jeopardy. Living secluded on their own property will only make life easier. Unfortunately, Lennie is indirectly the only person holding back the dreams of George. Going into the ranch the two of them work at, George was already cautious about the kind of behavior Lennie displayed. He emphasized to Lennie to remain in his best behavior so that everything could go as planned. Candy, an elderly man missing a hand devotes all his money to the same dream that George and Lennie have. They were all so close to moving on until Lennie ruined their dreams. Lennie and Curley’s wife ran into each other one day in the barn where Curley’s wife was talking to him without a sense of spite. Lennie started to play with her hair, but passively was doing it to rough. She began to scream,

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