How Does Steinbeck Use Of Foreshadowing In Of Mice And Men

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Dreamer All people in this world have a dream. Some dreams are more realistic than others. Some people's dreams drive them to the lows of the lows, yet a dream is not one to be given up on. In the book Of Mice and Men Lennie and George have a dream of one day owning their own farm. Through the use of Foreshadowing, Imagery, and Tension John Steinbeck reveals the theme that one's dreams will direct your actions, mindset, and attitude. John Steinbeck uses foreshadowing in the text to portray the future. In Mice of Men, the first use of foreshadowing is the definition of a calm resting place.“There is a path through the willows and among the sycamores, a path beaten hard by the boys coming down from the branches to swim in the deep pools”(Steinbeck …show more content…

Steinbeck describes Lennie and other issues on the farm with great detail and paints a picture in your mind. On the farm, Lennie is described as many things, though in the text Lennie is described as “Strong as a bull”(22). This paints a picture in the reader's mind of a very strong man. Steinbeck could also be referring to Lennie as an animal inferring that he has no self-control. As we can see in the text the many things Lennie has been unaware of killing. Steinbeck could also be referring to Lennie as a bull in a china shop, Lennie is always destroying things he doesn't understand his strength. Steinbeck also uses imagery with Lennie in how he describes the barn. “I don't like this place, George. This ain't no good place” (32) says, Lennie. This makes the reader think that the bunkhouse may be more than just a bunkhouse. The bunkhouse may represent suspicion and the very harsh life of the migrant workers. Throughout the text, the bunkhouse becomes a place of misery, despair, and anger. All of the men in the bunk are working towards the same goal of making it off the farm and making some money. Though some of them have a different attitude towards that such as crooks, who understands the harsh reality they are living in... “I ain't wanted in the bunkhouse, and you ain't wanted in my room.” (68) Crooks is very direct and almost harsh in the way he treats Lennie. This paints a picture in your …show more content…

George, obviously the leader of the group, is always watching over Lennie making sure that everything he says and does will hopefully put them in a better position to get them to their dream. Though Lennie is not the brightest person, he doesn't fully understand why George wants so much out of him, resulting in George getting mad at him very easily... George states, “He’s so god damn dumb. Like what happened in weed.” This creates tension in the text because George knows that he shouldn't have said that to the other guys. He needs to protect Lennie or they will end up walking all over him. George's greatest challenge is to protect Lennie from Curley and Curley’s wife because he knows that they have so much power on the ranch. Curley's wife questions Lennie “Where’s you get them bruises on your face?” Lennie looked up guilty. “Who me?” (80) Lennie understands that he is not allowed to talk to Curley’s wife, and he becomes panicked; Lennie is probably thinking about listening to what George says. It is very hard for Lennie sometimes, and he ends up coming up with a lie that doesn't always match the situation. It is almost Ironic that Curley's wife is asking why he has bruises on his face, for she probably already can tell that Curley and Lennie got into a fight. In the text, the most tension is when they discovered the dead body. “A moment settled and hovered and remained for much more than a moment.”

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