How Is Fahrenheit 451 Relevant Today

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The society in Fahrenheit 451, unlike the one we live in, is very controlling and have many rules most would deem dehumanizing. In the novel Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury, the protagonist Guy Montag seems to be in a perfect world but as you keep reading you learn that nothing is more far from the truth. In the society, owning books could get you killed. Also, speeding is not only ok, it is highly encouraged and you could get yourself in trouble if you don’t! It seems everyone is living as if they are a vessel lacking a soul and mind. People in that society such as Mildred, just go along with everything without giving a second thought, but when they do start questioning the society, and the way they live they get removed from the society …show more content…

Today in our society, reading books is often suggested by many parents, teachers, and doctors, because of the benefits it brings to the individual reading. Books are even often donated and given to those who isn’t capable of buying them themselves. However, in the novel it is significantly different from what we know today. In Fahrenheit 451, books are forbidden by the government and could result in severe consequences including you losing your life as shown on page 37 when a woman refused to leave her books which had resulted in her being engulfed in the flames along with her belongings, including her …show more content…

Today you can take time to think almost anytime and anywhere you want and taking time out of your day just to think is actually recommended and is said to have many benefits to one's self. Also, the concept of having our own thoughts, as of today in the society we live in, Although, this is far from the reality in Fahrenheit 451. In the novel, it states, "Off-hours, yes. But time to think? If you're not driving a hundred miles an hour, at a clip where you can't think of anything else but the danger, then you're playing some game or sitting in some room where you can't argue with the fourwall televisor. Why? The televisor is ‘real.’ It is immediate, it has dimension. It tells you what to think and blasts it in. It must be, right. It seems so right. It rushes you on so quickly to its own conclusions your mind hasn't time to protest, ‘What nonsense!'”(Page 9, Bradbury), which shows that the society doesn’t have time to think because there are things in place to try and prevent

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