How Is Technology Used In Fahrenheit 451

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Imagine you have to choose between a world without technology, only having access to books, and a world surrounded by only technology. At first, your instinct is to choose a world with technology, but would that be the utopia it appears to be? In Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, the effect that technology has on people is shown through numerous types of literary devices, such as metaphors and imagery. Within this novel, technology refers to any device that can be used for entertainment as well as communication. Imagery intricately describes a situation or image for the reader to picture in their minds, while metaphors make a specific comparison between two ideas. In, "Fahrenheit 451,” by Ray Bradbury, the author portrays technology as negatively …show more content…

Montag tries to have a conversation with Mildred concerning the previous night but she doesn’t appear to be interested, “‘Will you turn the parlor off?’ he asked. ‘That’s my family.’” (46) Mildred responds to Montag’s simple request of turning off the parlor in a reluctant tone. Rather than supporting her husband’s wishes and turning the television off, her immediate response is to defend the technology, which she does by referring to it as her “family.” Mildred’s tone when responding to Montag shows that she is not concerned with what he could be experiencing, and instead prioritizes her technology over her husband. Being Mildred’s husband, Montag is a part of her family. However, when Mildred refers to the parlor as her family she is acting as though they are more important than Montag. Following their interaction, that night while Mildred is laying in bed Montag begins to observe her, “Late in the night he looked over at Mildred. She was awake. There was a tiny dance of melody in the air, her Seashell was tamped in her ear again and she was listening to far people in far places, her eyes wide and staring at the fathoms of blackness above her in the ceiling.”(49) Montag is …show more content…

In part two, after Montag committed his crimes and began to run, his chase was covered and broadcast to the public. All over the city, the citizens were observing his pursuit in hopes of his capture. Montag was able to escape through the water, but his capture was shortly faked to satisfy the people and keep them ignorant. ‘Montag,’ the TV set said and lit up. ‘M-O-NT-A-G.’ The name was spelled out by the voice. ‘Guy Montag. Still running. Police helicopters are up. A new Mechanical Hound has been brought from another district.. .’ “ (126) At this time, the television is blaring and focused on Montag. His trailing is brought to the attention of the people by spelling out his name and mentioning the bringing of a new hound. The hound is primarily in use for dangerous and necessary situations, and the need for the hound makes Montag seem like an intense threat. All attention is being brought to him, and away from anything else that might be going on at this time. Through the use of imagery, Bradbury creates a vision in the reader’s mind of what the population in the city is currently seeing. Across the city, it is being broadcast that Montag is on the run, and being closely followed. At the same time that Guy, a singular person, has committed a crime, there is a current war going on. Instead of using the

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