Human Ecology And Political Economy

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Human ecology and political economy are similar but in different ways. Human ecology has to do more with the cultural adaptation of individuals in a society. This can be influenced by anything in retrospect, such as a tragedy, or a significant piece of legislation. Human ecology has to do with the development and adaptation of society (specifically urban society) based on drastictic changes, whether it be socially or geographically, and the ways that society adapts to them. Political economy has more to do with the economics and the social stratification of a region/nation. This is mainly influenced by prospects such as economical changes, corporations, and legislation. There is some overlap between the two, but there are also drastic differences…show more content…
Not only this, but it also considers the economic elites of a region, and also politics, and how politics and business go hand-in-hand. One of the individuals who studied political economy was Harvey Molotch, in which he concluded that government affairs and cooperations in their entirety control local economics and politics. Molotch closely studied how corporations and government play a role in industrial growth, and stated that political moves influence industry, and industry influences urban growth. This ‘urban growth’ can be viewed as beneficial, although Molotch views it in a pessimistic manner, degrading the system and how it perpetuates a system that will ultimately lead to its own demise. Businesses gain leverage over the labor force, and the labor force has control over the politicians (partially), and politicians have power over the business and the taxes they pay, but in the end industry reigns. If an industry dislikes the way that a government's policy is, they can simply move to a different place, putting a significant dent in the local economy. His main point of his research is that essentially, the ‘growth machine’ only truly benefits a small margin of the population, typically the 1% or the very wealthy. Others, such as the working class, are left to fluctuate at the mercy of the…show more content…
Economics plays a role in almost every portion of our lives, especially those in the urban areas where division (particularly based on social class) is prevalent. Nearly every aspect of the 5 groups that Ganz studied, has to do with economics. Regarding unmarried or childless, these individuals typically have more capital at their disposal, allowing them to possibly identify with the wealthier side of the community, as opposed to deprived or the trapped, who would be living in the deeply troubled lower class portions of the city. Individuals in the cosmopolites would likely find themselves among the wealthy as well, being that they are composed of artists, musicians, and entertainers. People like ethnic villagers are the only ones who don't exactly fit in with a social class, because as mentioned in class, these individuals are of almost all social classes, and yet they still choose to stick together rather than separating. This is because of comfort, and its similar to home. This is where human ecology and political economy do not overlap, and it essentially breaks the interdependence of both theories. Human ecology states that they would stay together because it is familiar, whereas political economy states that they should separate based on social class. This is not the case, as these ethnic enclaves are composed of all social
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