Human Poverty In Ghana

750 Words3 Pages
Over the past few decades, new perceptions on poverty have challenged the focus on income and consumption as the defining condition of poor people. Studies regarding the problems of poor people and societies, and of the hindrances and prospects to improving their condition, have led to an understanding of poverty as a complex set of deprivations. These different perspectives have refocused the idea of poverty as a human condition that reveals failures in many aspects of human life. These failures among others include unemployment, homelessness, hunger, illness and health care, powerlessness and victimization, and social injustice. All these add up to an assault on human dignity (UNDP 2006, p7). The evidence suffices that human poverty is a…show more content…
Ghana over the past few decades has made spectacular strides towards combating this menace by introducing some social intervention programs. Among these social intervention programs are: the Livelihood Empowerment against Poverty (LEAP); Capitation Grant; School Feeding Program; free distribution of school uniforms, exercise books and textbooks; and the recent introduction of free Senior High Education. In addition, other projects aimed at improving health care delivery have also been implemented. These include the establishment of Community-based Health Planning Services (CHPS); national immunization against polio and indoor residual spraying against malaria carrying mosquitoes; the introduction of the National Health Insurance Scheme; and free maternal health care – all aim at reducing…show more content…
This rapid growth in the economy has translated into accelerated poverty reduction. According to the World Bank, the poverty rate of Ghana fell by more than half between 1991 and 2012, from 52.7 percent to 21.4 percent. This remarkable reduction in poverty rate places the country on track to reduce the poverty rate in accordance with Sustainable Development Goal 1. Ghana’s performance however compares well with that of other African countries. In the year 2012, the poverty rate in Ghana was less than half the African average of 43 percent, while in 1991, it had been only 10 percent lower than the African rate (Molini and Paci, 2015). The extreme poverty rate declined even more quickly, dropping from 37.6 percent in 1991 to 9.6 percent in 2012. However, despite the tremendous growth in the economy, inequality has been increasing and poverty remains prevalent in many areas (Cooke, Hague and McKay
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