Human Relations Theory In The Workplace

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Unitarists start from a set of assumptions and values that hold workplace conflict is not an inevitable characteristic of relations between managers and employees. Conflict in the workplace may periodically emerge between the two, but such occurrences are believed to be aberrations in a relationship that is inherently prone to be cooperative. Those holding this perspective see managers and employees as having a common interest in the survival of their organisations, such that when conflicts occur it is unlikely to manifest itself to a point that will render the firm insolvent. Divisions that do exist are assumed to be the product of personality disorders, inappropriate recruitment and promotion practices, the deviance of dissidents, or poor…show more content…
Under these conditions the management approach to employee relations is one that seeks to suppress internal tension over the distribution of organisational power by ensuring that management retains superior knowledge about the structure and organisation of work, and has the authority to direct workers as it sees fit. Human relations theory The second theory comes from the so-called human relations school (see: Maslow, 1954; Mayo, 1933; Child, 1967). In this case the reduction of organisational tension is held to rest on the ability of individuals to achieve self-fulfilment in the workplace. Workers are regarded as qualitatively different to other resources used in production. Thus, if workers are denied autonomy on the job, or are reduced to acting as mere extensions of the machinery they operate, or are given work that inhibits their capacity to create and think, it is argued that they will invariably find ways to subvert the methods of control that enforce these conditions. The principal task of management on this conception is to manipulate workplace relations in ways that enable employees to feel personal satisfaction with being involved with the…show more content…
Human resource management The third theory refers to human resource management practices (see: Stone, 1995; Blyton& Turnbull, 1992; Guest, 1989). This form of management practice differs from the previous two in that it starts from the belief that organisational tensions can be completely resolved by nurturing a psychological contract based on cooperation. The employee relations’ choices in this instance are predicated on the belief that the forces uniting managers and employees are far stronger than the forces dividing them. It is the task of management to facilitate these unifying forces by establishing workplace conditions that encourage autonomous individuals, whether employees or management, to work collaboratively for the common good. Companies taking this approach are expected to regard workplace relations holistically, whereby collaboration between management and employees is encouraged through the development of a unifying culture, strong and pervasive leadership, and a clear vision of organisational
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