I Die In Combat, Box Me Up And Ship Me Home, By Tim O Brien

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In Tim O’Brien’s autobiographical novel, If I Die in Combat, Box Me up and Ship Me Home, he recounts his experience of being drafted into service and what happens in Vietnam. This memoir is structured within 23 chapters shifting between different time periods. The lack of chronological organization emphasizes the unpredictable nature of being in the military. The conflict that O’Brien faces is a struggle of moral and ethical judgment of his involvement in a war that he believes is unjust. He not only questions his personal involvement in the war, but he also questions the other participants reasoning for joining the war. This personal rendition takes the reader through a journey that reflects fundamental questions such as at what point does …show more content…

As a child of a military family, he admired his father and viewed him as a hero. O’Brien and his friends would venture to a local army store to purchase old equipment. His life was completely immersed by his father’s military life. Now he views the war as an evil thing. “And since it was wrong and since people were dying as a result of it, it was evil.” O’Brien becomes psychologically conflicted about the meaning and morality of the war. Erik, a fellow solider, intellectually challenges O’Brien to question what their roles are in war. Together they show a psychological resistance to the military throughout the …show more content…

He learned that to expand his thinking he must be open to compromise. So even though he compromised one principle, he fulfilled many others. He learned about the true meaning of courage from Captain Johansen. He learned that loyalty is a strong bond in a war zone, and those solider are not only his friends but his brothers. His experience was similar to other veterans, because he went through same experiences and felt similar emotions as other veterans of war. A main difference between his experience and others was that he still felt that the war was unjust, but he continued to fight out of loyalty to his family and fellow

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