I Love Lucy Analysis

2083 Words9 Pages
Through programs aired on television during the 1950s and 1960s, women were encouraged to engage in domestic jobs as housewives, but as time progressed, the role of the female on television developed, encouraging women to view actresses as empowering. A prime example of the stereotypical label of a woman during the time can be seen through the television program, “I Love Lucy,” on CBS. Released on October 15, 1951, this sitcom reached an audience of ten million households, while also ranking number one in America for three years consecutively (Stark 26). The lead star, Lucille Ball, triumphed as one of the first females to appear as a lead role, representing women in the entertainment business. Her character, Lucy Ricardo, portrayed an…show more content…
Through several broadcasting networks on television, Dwight Eisenhower set the precedent of transmitting the presidential press conference for all of America to see on January 19, 1955 (Stark 93). However, Eisenhower’s press conference was aired on a delayed basis to allow the White House to rectify any mistakes (93). On the contrary, John F. Kennedy decided to televise the first live presidential press conference with 418 reporters and 60 million Americans viewing, similar to how stations aired his four live political debates with Richard Nixon (93). As a result of televising political events live, America garnered authentic information about the country in a swift manner. In addition to increasing the knowledge of Americans, television influenced how society envisioned the president. Therefore, Kennedy successfully exercised the use of media, specifically the television, to magnify his dignified, statesmanlike mannerism through live airings of noteworthy events he attended (Soddu). Through broadcasting live political events, television constructed a new age of public affairs and communication for presidents, journalists, and viewers (Stark 92). As well as influencing how Americans perceived politics and the government, television formed subtle efforts to encourage America to discern the…show more content…
With the rise of advertising on television came a demand for additional workers. Thus, one agency, led by Ben Duffy, expanded from 12 to 150 people in the 1950s, indicating the start of a new thriving age for advertising (Tungate 36). As well as increasing their members, agencies sought to maximize their spending money. Therefore, although advertising businesses only spent a total of 12 million dollars on television advertisements in 1949, by 1952, agencies managed to expend up to 158 million dollars on television advertisements (36). The expansion of employment and money in the advertising business reflected how television prompted society to ameliorate businesses by effectively operating modern
Open Document