Avicenna's The Canon Of Medicine

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Register to read the introduction…The Canon of Medicine is an encyclopedia of five volumes revolving around the topic of medicine, which was completed in 1025. The Canon consisted of all medical knowledge up until that time. However, he also combined his own medical observation that had never been documented before. The Canon was originally written in Arabic, however it was then translated to a series of languages including Persia, English, Chinese, Latin and Hebrew. These translations had further added to its exposure, resulting in it being accepted and distributed in both Europe and the Middle East. Eventually, it became the medical authority for centuries and was used as a textbook in many prestigious universities and became a widespread medical piece in the east and west. Breakthroughs, which had significant impacts on both…show more content…
This discovery greatly contributed to the understanding of the human anatomy and cardiology. Avicenna stated that every beat of the pulse contained two movements and two pauses, therefore describing it as expansion, pause, contraction, pause. This innovation led to his discovery of the modern approach of measuring pulse by the wrist, a useful technique still practiced today. Checking your pulse is a free and simple way to check the condition of your health, and the strength of your heart. The heart is the main organ of the body and maintaining its condition is significant to your health. Over time many scientists recognized this, but they also wanted to invent a simpler way to count the number of beats per minute to identify when a heart rate was normal or abnormal. These discoveries led to various inventions still used today. An example includes inventions such as the electrocardiogram. Finally, Avicenna’s discoveries of the arterial pulse subsequently led to his discovery of heart…show more content…
He then concluded that the patient was in love with a girl whose home Avicenna was able to pinpoint based on the examination of his pulse. This demonstrates how physicians in the early Islamic period diagnosed certain medical illnesses by using palpitations and the arterial pulse to indicate abnormal heart rate, allowing certain sickness to be treated before reaching late stages. Similarly, regarding the impact of the arterial pulse, the discovery of heart palpitations also affected modern times as it furthered humans’ knowledge on cardiology, which led the way to several new breakthroughs such as physicians to using pulse and palpitation as a diagnosis as well as prognosis. In conclusion, Avicenna’s book The Canon of Medicine was a significant piece of medical work as it educated people through its medical doctrines. The breakthroughs included within the piece impacted not only the understanding of medicine in the pre Islamic civilization but also today. Overall, Avicenna’s first correct explanation of the arterial pulse and the discovery of heart palpitations contributed to the development of cardiology and further advancements in
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