Idealism In 'The Invisible Presences By Flannery O' Connor

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Although everyone on the planet cannot conform to what Delaney’s invisible presences, that is how Delaney invisions perfection in his world. For instance when delaney doesn;t like something he gets mad and upset, “‘Because it was true,’ I replied firmly. ‘I wasn't going to tell him a lie. ‘‘What lie?’ ‘That I was at Mass.’ ‘Then couldn't you say you had to go on a message?’ ‘That would be a lie too’” (O’Connor 211). This shows that even if it got him in trouble Delaney would tell the truth, because he also wants to do what the “invisible presences” tell him to do. Another example is towards the middle of the book where he says, “‘I didn't take anything, sir,’ I said in a low voice. ‘Did you see someone else do it?’ he asked raising his brows…show more content…
Starting the story, O’Connor made Delaney describe his ideal world. Delaney acted on what the “invisible presences” told him to, and he tried to get everyone else to have the same beliefs as him also. Such as when he didn’t want to snitch on Gorman for stealing Flanagans money, "’Because it wouldn't be right,’I sobbed. ‘Why wouldn't it be right?’ ‘Because Gorman should have told the truth himself,’ I said” (O’Connor 217). But towards the end of the story his viewpoints on life itself changed drastically changed. In the final sentence of the story, O’Connor decided to end things off with a bang by adding this last piece, “But by that time I didn't care. In my school sack I had another story. Not a school story this time though. School stories were a washout: ‘Bang! Bang!’ — that was the only way to deal with men like the Murderer” (O’Connor). Delaney had given up and had stopped trying to be an idealist. He realized that some people do not change no matter what you do, and Delaney was so angered and pestered by that idea that in the end, he murdered the murderer…show more content…
For example towards the end of the story, after Delaney had already stood up to him, Moloney showed signs of relief as this happened, "’What kept you, Delaney?’ the Murderer asked quietly. I knew it was no good. ‘I was at Mass, sir.’ ‘All right. Take your seat’ (O’Connor 220). This proves that the all powerful Murderer Moloney, who once had a significant amount of power of Delaney and his disciples. The school and it’s principles relied on lies to survive, and nothing good ever comes from lying so much, especially when a schools moral system is based solely around lies. Another horrible thing that the people in Delaney’s schools had to go through were the beatings. Delaney first explained how the beatings worked towards the beginning of the book, where he stated this, “Even so, I couldn't help being disgusted at the bad way things were run in our school. Our ‘venerable pile’ was a red brick building without tower or pinnacle a fellow could climb, and no ghost at all… and, instead of giving you ‘lines’, Latin or any other sort, Murderer Moloney either lifted you by the ears or bashed you with a cane. When he got tired of bashing you on the hands he bashed you on the legs” (O’Connor 210). The beatings that these children had to endure were extremely harsh, and one of the worst parts of it were
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