Ideology Of Childhood

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The Ideology and Policy of Childhood This essay will discuss Boyden’s chapter ‘Childhood and the Policy Makers: A Comparative Perspective on the Globalization of Childhood from Constructing and Reconstructing Childhood (1997). The essay will focus on how Boyden describes societal context as shaping the needs and rights of children, it will contemplate how these two terms differ according to Boyden. The essay will then discuss how policy surrounding these needs and rights affects children globally. The essay will end by discussing how Boyden believes these policies can be understood and changed to better affect children both in the North and South. The ideology of the South continually separates children from adults by a multitude of psychological…show more content…
The concept of childhood has continually changed over time Boyden uses Britain and its development of workhouses for idle children who were practically criminalised as an example of this phenomenon (1997, p.193). In the North the ideology has remained that children must be controlled by adults to follow moral behaviour, this is continually encouraged by the juvenile crime statistics presented to them (Boyden, J, 1997, p.194). Much of this changing perception of childhood coincides with the changing nature of ‘street life’. Especially in Northern Europe the streets became a place to be feared with families increasingly withdrawing from it and into a conception of private life as being within the home (Boyden, J, 1997, p.195). With this the home and school where perceived as the prime agents of socialization for children (Boyden, J, 1997, p.195). Following this development school attendance was deemed compulsory in many areas and with it non- attendance became a criminal offence (Boyden, J, 1997, p.196). This change in the concept of street life led to a change in public perception of street child…show more content…
During the drafting process of the UNCRC many Southern countries expressed concern over its western nature as many of the concepts of a ‘normal childhood’ simply would not apply to their countries. Many simply refused to take part in the drafting process. It was suggested that they should be able to interpret and apply the UNCRC as they see fit. Concerns were also expressed over the concept of family used by the UNCRC often referring to parents when in many cultures but especially those outside the Western world these often do not regularly apply (Boyden, J, 1997, p.204). Western culture is also predominantly individualist while Southern countries depend often on group solidarity particularly in meeting the needs of children (Boyden, J, 1997, p.207). With such drastic differences between cultures how can policy be applied
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