If I Die In A Combat Zone By Tim O Brien

1031 Words5 Pages

If I Die in a Combat Zone: Final Term Paper For the United States, the Vietnam War was an unwelcome incident that President Johnson agreed to assist South Korea with. The American people suffered great losses and are still to this day recovering from the terror of the War. From the inside thoughts in If I Die in a Combat Zone, author Tim O'Brien shows how the Vietnam War was detrimental and unhealthy through his depictions of horrid treatment of the innocent Vietnamese people, how fear and murder was now absent from the minds of the servicemen, and the soldier's experiences with different leaders in their lives as foot soldiers. Reading the autobiography/personal memoir of a foot soldier in the jungles of Vietnam, the idea that everyday …show more content…

As a footsoldier, O’Brien became accustomed to lying in a trench or burying himself in the mud through an attack. The warriors O’Brien fought with became used to getting shot at at least ten times a day and became immune to the fear that came with it (pg. 2). As “Men die, fear hurts and humiliates” (pg. 23). The troops of the Vietnam War spent long, hot days out in the sun avoiding mines and snipers (pg. 101). They were active on foot for never-ending cycles of duty and pushed on through unbearable attacks and battle. However, the soldiers described by O’Brien never ran away from the fight and showed great sacrifice. Like all heroes of battle, they cared for their wounded, counted their dead and moved on for the cause, despite hating it the whole time, in O’Brien’s case. For example, the soldiers in the Alpha Company prayed for the opportunity for a back job where they would have a better chance at survival and could finally escape the life of the battlefield (pg. …show more content…

Some days were the basic routine that all the soldiers become accustomed to, and some were more unpredictable that usually resulted in many deaths. O’Brien’s Company experienced many changes of officers. Some were for the better, while others proved to be careless and harmful to the troops. Their first and favorite, Captain Johansen, was an asset to the troops and helped lead them safely into the danger zones and villages throughout the first section of the book. The lives of the soldiers were in no way easy, but they seemed at ease with their captain. As the book progresses, they meet Captain Smith, from ROTC. Captain Smith seemed to be a worry for the Company, as he would often get them lost and liked to argue about plans with other officers (pgs 158-159). The changes in leadership caused a change in the morale of the soldiers, and some begged for other jobs away from the outside life (pg. 175). Their lives were altered by the people they were around, and the different experiences with the contrast of character, training, and care of the leadership are crucial to knowing the importance of quality guidance in the

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