Imagery In Thomas Jefferson's The Declaration Of Independence

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The Declaration of Independence is an extremely well written document that our country has abided by since the year 1776. It was written by Thomas Jefferson beautifully, with several rhetorical devices. These devices help pull the reader into further believing what the Jefferson is trying to tell them. The first rhetorical device to address is Jefferson’s use of imagery. They aren’t seen to commonly but there are to Prime examples of it within this document. At a point Jefferson states, “… it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another…” (262) This helps truly create an image of the political bands being dissolved and allowing more freedom. Another example of imagery is on page 263 when Jefferson wrote, “To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.” Using…show more content…
Jefferson states, “...the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them…”(262). This reference to God causes it to be easier to relate to what Jefferson is saying and become closer to his opinion. Another quote where God is referred to is, “...that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable Rights…”(262). With Jefferson alluding to God it also could give one insight and show that he is a religious based person and can create more knowledge of he, himself for the audience of the document. Overall, Jefferson’s uses of rhetorical devices throughout this document was extremely effective because it helped tremendously in creating more understanding for his position of the reasoning behind why the United States should gain freedom. Without these devices the document would be extremely flat with no real intriguement for one to join the side of Jefferson, and without people on Jefferson’s side, who knows what would be of the United States of America
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