Morten Tyldum: Film Analysis

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This 2014 historical drama is directed by Morten Tyldum based on Graham Moore’s scenario in the studio of Weinstein Company (Moore, 2017). Benedict Cumberbatch, playing Alan Turing, is a relative of him emerging in the 14th century (IMDB, 2015). He acknowledges the difficulties he faced in order to be able to fully capture and deliver Turing’s personality, values, and perspective to the audience. Lack of video or audio recordings made the filmmakers to rely on only written documents and memories of Turing’s family (NPR, 2015). Actress Keira Knighley, playing Joan Clarke, also mentions the importance of the movie in delivering the achievements of a less known hero Turing. She also acknowledges that “Imitation game” is not a documentary but…show more content…
For example, Moore named his machine “Christopher” in order to accentuate Turing’s love towards his childhood friend. Turing sacrificed his health (by accepting hormonal interference leading to the mental and corporal failure) in order to sustain Christopher’s soul embodied in the machine. By adding such colors to the history, the movie tries to persuade the audience that sublime love should not be confused with sexual orientation in the exemplification of Turing as a man who possesses a pure and everlasting love after the death of Christopher as like any other ‘normal’ people. The movie stands between celebration of differences and tragedy of varying tastes, perspectives, and lifestyle…show more content…
A different view from the individual and his/her group is perceived as a threat to its existence and security; therefore, such perceived enemy image hampers the conflict resolution. A good pithy phrase from the film is “…they beat you because you are different...”. Dehumanization is the undesirable consequences of such enemy image. Labeling Alan Turing, a hero who saved 10 million lives by shortening the WW2 by 2 years, as indecent because of his sexual orientation, in my opinion, is a taint to human integrity.’ Conclusion “The Imitation Game”, as a historical drama not solely based on historical facts, received “C+” from the “The Guardian” film review in terms of historical correspondence; however, the film promulgates a less known genius’ contribution to end the WWII, as well as the acceptance of individual
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