Immorality In The Great Gatsby

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Throughout the course of American history, the notoriously famous novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald has been believed to be a prominent novel encompassing the concept of morality. As the events of the novel transpire, many immoral actions that take place among the main characters. These immoral actions are identified and clearly classified by the foundational ideologies of the time period. However, it is important to recognize and identify the significant “nonjudgmental lens” through which Nick witnesses the immoral actions. Due to the fact that Nick attempts to inform the audience unbiased, it formulates a viewpoint that does not condemn nor call to action the immoral actions upon the characters of the novel, such as Gatsby and…show more content…
It is important to first recognize that Daisy, even though in search for her true love, still preformed and committed immoral actions repeatedly throughout her quest. For example, during the party thrown later within the novel, Gatsby and Daisy both quietly exited the event to kiss and hold each other alone near Nicks house. Daisy is clearly married to Tom Buchanan, therefore in her action of kissing another man and engaging in other activities, this means that Daisy committed adultery. Not only on the previous occasion mentioned, yet on numerous other secret visits to Gatsby’s mansion. Daisy also kissed and even went as far to tell Gatsby she lived him in Tom’s house and far worse, in front of Tom. “She had told him that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw. He was astounded” (Fitzgerald 119). Not only does Daisy cheat on Tom, yet she also like her husband she does not care too much if her spouse willingly knows. Daisy’s interactions of adultery are undoubtedly immoral, yet they also leave a lasting impact upon the people she has hurt. “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy---they smashed up things and creatures and then returned back into their money or their vast carelessness” (Fitzgerald 179). Nick Carraway, in his inactive and inattentive viewpoint, truly captured the overarching immoral…show more content…
Although in a quest to reunite with the true love of his life, Jay Gatsby relentlessly pursued and pushed love, resulting in adultery, deception, and more importantly the death of the man himself. Gatsby truly believed that in order to win back the heart of his long lost love, it was necessary to recreate their past love. Not only did this backfire tremendously upon Gatsby, yet his plan encouraged adultery and the usage of others in his environment. “They had forgotten me, but Daisy glanced up and held out her hand; Gatsby didn’t know me now at all” (Fitzgerald 96). The subtle remark by Nick Carraway carries truly a much deeper meaning than upon the surface. The true meaning to Nick’s remark is that once Gatsby received what he truly desired and was able to be with Daisy again, he threw Nick back to the side. Gatsby did not need Nick in plan any longer and so brushed off any sort of communication for many weeks while he was having a secret affair with Daisy. Not only is Gatsby’s interaction and relationship with Nick immoral, yet it is also abusive. Gatsby even pursued further with his aggressive plan and was repeatedly requesting that Daisy tell her own husband that she never loved him at all. “I love you now – isn’t that enough? I can’t help what’s past” (Fitzgerald
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