Impact Of Jim Crow Laws In To Kill A Mockingbird

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What impact did Jim Crow laws have on blacks and what rights did they violated as illustrated in the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird? Jim Crow laws significantly impacted the population between the whites and blacks with the most important law of separation for public transportation and public facilities. According to Social Welfare, “Beginning in the 1880s, the term Jim Crow was used as a reference to practices, laws, or institutions related to the physical separation of black people from white people” (1). The rights that Jim Crow laws violated were the whites desire to have control over the blacks. This violation created advantages for the whites to have a peaceful atmosphere and caused the blacks to suffer from racial inequality. Lee demonstrated…show more content…
A white person was considered to have greater taste and quality, which influenced the assumption that all blacks were immoral beings and not trusted to be around white women. Scout’s brother Jem explained the class division of Maycomb by categorizing the four types of people in the town’s society. In relations to the Jim Crow laws, the people who were ranked from highest to lowest of respect were the Ordinary, Poor, live off the government, and finally at the bottom of degradation were black people. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Maycomb considered the black people to be unsuccessful, African-American, and least respectable as Jem stated, “You know something, Scout? I’ve got it all figured out, now. There’s four kinds of folks in the world. There’s the ordinary kind like us and the neighbors, and there’s the kind like the Cunningham’s out in the woods, the kind like the Ewells down at the dump, and the Negroes” (258). In To Kill a Mockingbird, the issues of class in the novel of the town of Maycomb truly acknowledged the fact that the color of a person’s skin determined their status in…show more content…
The white, upper class ladies of Maycomb, such as Miss Dubois and Aunt Alexandra were considered to be healthy and wealthy. During the 1930’s, the ideal girl was an image of pure femininity. In To Kill a Mockingbird, there were many gender role issues that were demonstrated with the narrator Scout, such as her training that was focused mainly on language, dress, appropriate dresses, and elegant hats. Scout was an independent woman who was ridiculed by the Southern belles of society, which was a symbolic element in the novel to show Scout’s promise a failure to act like a proper southern lady. According to “Gender Stereotypes of To Kill a Mockingbird,” “Little girls typically played with dolls, played house, and had tea and dress up parties. A proper young lady learned to dance properly in white gloves and wore a long dress and was part of the many socialite clubs in society” (1). The female role in the novel was to uphold their professional appearance and keep up with the status quo. The expectations of little girls were to be refined in their speech and portray soft-spoken
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