Imperialism In Africa

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Imperialism is a process that occurs when a more powerful country takes over a less powerful country and this could be through the use of force or threats (Young & Alcock, 1974). Imperialism can either be Political, Military, Cultural, Communication and Economic or it can be a combination of these kinds of Imperialism’s. Imperialism led to opportunities for profit accumulation, trading and investment opportunities (Freund, 1984). The need for raw materials in Europe for manufacturing gave small African traders and small African farmers the opportunity to be involved in international trade. The change from slave trade to a more legal trade led to a crisis and Europeans assumed that the only solution to this crisis was to make all non-European…show more content…
African families focused on surviving, providing food for their families, even though surplus production was exchanged through the system of barter. This ‘barter’ system was later developed from individual barter to rather a more regional barter. This can be evident in the relationship Sudan and the Mediterranean region had, Sudan supplied the Mediterranean region with raw materials in exchange for Mediterranean goods which were manufactured (Iliffe, 1983). African economies were mostly made up of hunter-gathering economies. This traditional economic system led to the development of various tools and weapons used by hunters for hunting. African development did not occur at the same time and this was due to geographical reasons such as part of the lower Nile valley, which is closely located and share the same environmental conditions with the Middle East and secondly Egypt which ended up adopting development strategies from Western Asia (Austen, 1987). Western transport developments played an important role in African economic development. Stabilized food production is the driving force behind establishing new complex societies (Iliffe, 1983). Changes occurred in the ways of food production due to changes in the environment and change in human populations. Human populations were rapidly increasing, so the demand for food started to increase and this caused a strain on…show more content…
Geographical factors and climate in South Africa attracted with modern economic skills and this played a role in Gold acting as a growth engine for SA (Feinstein, 2005). The settlers introduced their country’s traditions to the country they migrated to and as such developed different institutions which were important economic growth and increasing incomes. Exporting of mineral resources played an important role in developing South Africa. The surpluses from the mining sector contributed to South Africa industrialising. The apartheid government allowed free trade between countries resulting in a wide import and export market which thus led to a variety of goods being produced and sold (Fedderke, 2001). This allowed the diamond and gold sector to develop in the global economy. South Africa was advantageous in terms of minerals, the climate and their harbour ports but all this was constrained by the insufficient labour. The government assisted with the provision of cheap unskilled labour from different parts of Africa. The Government formed institutions and policies were made to make sure that the whites benefited from economic development and in this way capitalist production was
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