Imperialism In George Orwell's 1984

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The setting of George Orwell’s 1984 is set in the near future of Oceania. Oceania is in a continuous state of war where bombs go off relentlessly. In Oceania the living conditions of the country are extremely poor and the buildings have been ruined. The clothes given are poorly made, people are paid in small wages, and the food served out are rationed and artificially made. The telescreens that are placed in almost every room monitor behaviour visually and audibly. Every place Winston goes, even his own home, he is under surveillance by the Party through the telescreens. Wherever he looks he sees the figure of Big Brother who is the omniscient leader of the Party. The Party’s supremacy is demonstrated as they control everything in the nation,…show more content…
He notices a girl, staring at him. He worries that she is an informant who will expose and turn him in for his thoughtcrime. Winston is troubled by the Party’s control of history, as he seems to recall a time when Oceania weren’t in an alliance with Eastasia in a war against the country of Eurasia. In addition, the Party claims that the leader of the Brotherhood, Emmanuel Goldstein is a treacherous man, despite this, this does not seem credible to Winston. Winston spends his evenings walking through the poorest neighbourhoods in Oceania, where proles (commoners), live extremely filthy lives and are somewhat are free from the surveillance of the…show more content…
After a period of time together, they rent a room above the second hand store where Winston had purchased his diary. Sooner or later Winston knows that Julia and him will be caught and punished. The pessimistic Winston knows that he was doomed ever since he wrote his first diary entry, on the other hand Julia is more positive. Finally, he receives the message of that O’Brien wants to see him. Winston and Julia both travel to O’Brien’s opulent apartment. O’Brien confesses to Winston and Julia that, he as well loathes the Party, and that he works against the Party as a member of the Brotherhood where he teaches Julia and Winston into the Brotherhood. O’Brien then gives Winston a copy of Emmanuel Goldstein’s book. Winston reads the book, which is the public declaration of the Brotherhood. Abruptly, soldiers barge in and take Winston and Julia away. Mr. Charrington, the store proprietor, revealed to being a member of the Thought
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