Importance Of English In Colonization

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“Knowing English is like possessing the fabled Aladdin’s lamp, which permits one to open, as it were, the linguistic gates to international business, technology, science, and travel. In short, English provides linguistic power.” (Kachru B. B., 1990). English is used widely across the globe and there is no doubt that it aids in effective communication. The quote by Larry Smith has given a general view of World Englishes. Based on that quote, English differ from one nation to another and it does not belong to any nation. English usage may vary due to cultural difference and hence acceptance is importance as to get the message across. In some countries, English is used as the first language, some as second and foreign in the others. Hence, there…show more content…
In the world we live in today, English is now spoken in almost every country. The number of native speakers (ENL users) is less than those in the outer circle (ESL users). Why so? English began to spread to the other parts of the world via migration to America, Australia and New Zealand and that resulted in different accents. This was known as the first diaspora (16th and 17th century) and for the second diaspora (18th and 19th century), English spread to Asia and Africa through colonisation. The second dispersal of English results in the emergence of World Englishes and crucially, it is also the common tongue for many non-English speakers the world over, and almost a quarter of the globe’s population - maybe 1½-2 billion people - can understand it and have at least some basic competence in its use, whether written or spoken. (Who Speaks…show more content…
To the speakers in Inner Circle, English is used in their society may or may not be intelligible to those from the other circles. “Discussions of differences across varieties of English lead inevitably to concerns about intelligibility, often broadly taken to mean ‘understanding’.” (Kachru & Nelson, 2011). There are three aspects when it comes to understanding – intelligibility, comprehensibility and interpretability. When it comes to occasion, especially in less formal environment, we tend to use World Englishes and not Standard English. Hence, not everyone would be able to understand the meaning (low comprehensibility) and know of the intention of the speaker (low interpretability) although they recognize the words (high intelligibility). For example, a speaker from Inner Circle may say “What is cooking?” and speakers from other circles may take the meaning literally when it actually has the same meaning as “How are you?” or “What’s up?”. Though we have high intelligibility most of the time, it does not mean that we could properly understand what is being said by speakers of different circles as code mixing and code-switching tend to take place, especially in the Outer Circle (would be elaborated further in Part 2). English tend to be nativised and culture is one of the main factors. Purists consider nativised English as a mistake and an abuse to Standard English but acceptance is truly important
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