Importance Of Infantilization

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In the first phase, to understand the usefulness of infantilization, we need first to appreciate the meaning of this area. In many places, accordingly, the most prominent characteristic of Infantilization is that the more the learner acts or feels like an infant, the better he could acquire the target language. In the perception of education, infantilization is a normal phenomenon associated with authority, in other words, prestige. Ordinarily, in infantilization learning, authority is employed to establish a connection between teacher and student similar to a parent-child relationship. In this sense, the learner plays a child's role by participating in role-playing, games, songs, and gymnastic exercises; as a consequence, these activities…show more content…
It stands to reason that the child can memorize more quickly than the adult and that, with age, the function of memory begins to dwindle its ability away; in contrast to the development of the capacities of reason. Conversely, the constant functioning of reason often results in decreased memorization. Notwithstanding the object and focus of the course are mostly adult ones, infantilization brings about an atmosphere of spontaneity, ease of learning and an absence of a feeling of pressure. Moreover, infantilization helps adults to learn in a childlike (but not childish) way, following natural conditions and making use of unconscious effort. It goes without saying that infantilization is particularly essential for bridging the gulf between learning and acquisition. As a concluding remark, it is best to point it out that the student has the freedom to pick up a new name or identity for himself/ herself to assist them in the role plays and to help them detach themselves from their past learning experiences as a fundamental part of the…show more content…
In contrast, we should use different methods to engage the students in acquiring a language. Infantilization, in fact, remembers us the first language acquisition. In this process, we learn subconsciously and naturally, and the parents help us to acquire our first language. In some other scenarios, in which there is a teacher, the work done in class is mostly communication oriented: the teacher talks with the students like they are conversating at home. So, in that way, the student feels free from anxiety, stress and grade point while speaking without being afraid of making mistakes. But, in Turkish schools, it seems pertinent to assume that students do not dare to speak, especially in the target language. Similarly, they do not attempt to ask questions nor answer questions, particularly in the big classes accompanied by an authoritarian teacher who employs traditional methods. At this point, most Turkish students are introvert, reserved, uninterested, passive and bashful. For me, a child should be open, frank, talkative, free from ego-defense and anxiety, inquisitive and active and these qualities are psychological, neither biological nor intellectual. In this respect, infantilization exclusively concerns with attitude and feeling. Therefore, this principle would be an effective and efficient way to revamp the student's
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