Japanese Internment In WWII

1680 Words7 Pages
Japanese Internment in WWII
The Internment of Japanese Americans is a big part of American history, it was a terrible thing that the United states government did and caused harm to many innocent people. But, before we can judge if it was a bad thing that the government did or a good thing we must first take a in depth look at this part of history. In order to understand Japanese internment it is necessary to examine Japanese Americans’ lives before,during and after internment: what they dealt with, how it affected them, and how they moved on?

Pearl Harbor is not the sole reason why we chose the Japanese Americans over German Americans for internment, they were other factors at play. We chose them because of the prejudice that traditional
…show more content…
The establishing of the camps were issued by Franklin Roosevelt’s executive order 9066 which from 1942 to 1945 it was policy of the U.S Government that all people of Japanese descent to be moved and interned in isolated camps (internment camps). This executive order was enacted after the devastating attack on pearl harbor and the ensuing war with Japan. The executive order 9066 was established on February 19, 1942 with the intention of preventing espionage on American shores and the overall well being of the country. Military zones were created in California, Washington, and Oregon these states are with large Japanese populations, the order commanded relocation of Japanese Americans, this order affected the lives of 117,000 people the majority of these affected people were Japanese american citizens. Other countries did exactly what the united states did, the biggest one being Canada when they relocated 21,000 of their Japanese citizens from their west coast. Weeks before executive order 9066 was put into motion the United States Navy removed Japanese citizens from Terminal Island which is near the port of Los Angeles, and on December 7th 1941 just hours after the happenings of pearl harbor the Federal Bureau of investigation or more commonly called the FBI rounded up 1,291 japanese community and religious leaders arresting…show more content…
This rating was high, particularly when compared to the national average of 28:1. Educational staff rarely exceeded five women and seven men in a basic school system that enrolled 1,774 pupils.
Many internment camps had multiple schools to educate the numerous children detained there. Often entire blocks of barracks were converted for grade school classrooms, but they were ‘prison-esque’ blocks that contained few windows.
When there was no learning or working going on there was sports

In conclusion, overall this was a horrible event in American history, it involved lot’s of racial prejudice and the misuse of federal power. Hopefully the american government will learn from their mistake and never due this dastardly act again. In order to understand Japanese internment it is was necessary to examine Japanese Americans’ lives before,during and after internment: what they dealt with, how it affected them, and how they moved
Open Document