Importance Of Job Rotation

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Job rotation, sometimes called cross training, is one of the many forms of on-the-job training and a formal effort at executive development (Zeira, 1974; Beatty, Schneier and McEvoy, 1987). Job rotation can be defined as lateral transfer of employees among a number of different positions and tasks within jobs where each requires different skills and responsibilities. Individuals learn several different skills and perform each task for a specified time period. Rotating job tasks helps worker understand the different steps that go into creating a product and/or service delivery, how their own effort affects the quality and efficiency of production and customer service, and how each member of the team contributes to the process. Hence, job rotation…show more content…
First, in research on mobility, the rate of future job change has been predictable from the rate of past job change (Anderson, Milkovich, & Tsui, 1981; Forbes, 1987; Rosenbaum, 1979). Second, work on mobility and executive development implies that number of job experiences is important to career attainment (Gabarro, 1987; McCall et al., 1988). Third, work on promotion proposes that broad experience within a company is linked to promotion as a result of employees ' acquisition of organization-specific skills and the consequent incentive to organizations to promote from within (Markham et al., 1987). Similarly, if job rotation is related to promotion, it may also be related to salary growth because promotions are usually defined in part as increases in compensation grade level. Researchers have advocated frequent rotation (e.g., daily) among production jobs as a means of reducing boredom and fatigue (Miller, Dhaliwal, & Magas, 1973; Walker & Guest, 1952). Fairly frequent rotation among jobs for a period after the initial hiring of professional employees (rotation every six months for two years, for instance) has been used for orientation and placement (Wexley & Latham,…show more content…
Experience with rotation may positively influence employee perceptions of skill acquisition for two reasons. First, experience with rotation may enhance familiarity with its outcomes. Thus, if skill is related to rotation, perceptions of skill outcomes will increase as an employee gains experience with rotation. Second, cognitive consistency theories (Festinger, 1957; Heider, 1946) suggest that the greater individuals ' investments in rotation—for example, the higher their rate of rotation has been—the more likely they will be to view rotation positively. job rotation increases affective career-related outcomes such as employee satisfaction, motivation, involvement, and commitment. Work on executive development suggests additional benefits (Howard & Bray, 1988; McCall et al., 1988), including improved organizational knowledge—concerning business strategy and contacts in other areas, for example—and personal development, such as improved ability to cope with uncertainty and self-insight into strengths and weaknesses. Depending on the jobs experienced, rotation may be a form of enlargement or enrichment for an employee. The job design literature suggests additional benefits, such as opportunities for increased variety, challenge, and achievement (Campion & McClelland, 1991, 1993). Traditionally job rotation has been linked to some obvious advantages, as mentioned previously. As
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