Importance Of Protection Of The Environment

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Introduction Protection of the environment and economic growth are generally seen as opposing goals. It is greatly believed that protection of the environment leads to an overall cost to the world’s economies. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says that the burning of fossil fuels is responsible for around 80% of carbon emissions in the United States. This is simply because of our history; the historical use of fossil fuels following the industrial revolution was seen to lead to greater efficiency and lower costs for manufacturers. Since the beginning of time people have used renewable resources to carry out their so-called development. People used wood for cooking, solar energy for lighting fires, and wind and water to mill grain.…show more content…
Although the amounts released by these sources are difficult to measure, the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) estimates a staggering amount of 80 to 288 million tons, compared to the 69 million tons released by natural sources. In addition, the release of nitrogen oxide is carried out by oceans, biological decay, volcanoes, and lightning storms. The release of both of these chemical compounds can lead to severe cases of acid rain. ii/ Manmade Pollutants The manmade pollution can be most directly attributed to the burning of various types of fuel. The use of motor vehicles is the cause of the greatest emission of pollutants. Additionally, the proliferation of many industries and power plants burning coal and oil leads to a greater concentration of air pollution. Another source of air pollution is the use of commercial incinerators for large-scale waste disposal. This leads to the increase in smog and decrease of the quality of air. 2/ Water…show more content…
This form of pollution can be attributed to the use of pesticides and insecticides, which takes the nitrogen compounds from the soil and makes it an unsuitable environment for plants to grow. In addition, industrial waste and deforestation pollutes the soil. Since the increase in world population demands an increase in food supply, the need for genetically engineered crops, which is characterized by the increased use of pesticides, will become greater. The problem with soil pollution is just that: the increasing world population. The current trends show that soil quality will continue to drop, but the need for larger plots of land will continue to rise. The dichotomy between both of these statistics provides a definite problem for the future without resolution of this form of
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