Silent Movies Research Paper

2029 Words9 Pages
In our current age, silent films are considered to be a form of entertainment that are for a unique type of audiences. If one was to compare the popularity of silent films between two different time periods, say the early 1900s and the 2000s, they would be able to instantly conclude that silent films are no longer popular among people. When it comes to silent films in 2018, many people believe that they are a waste of time to watch. Despite the fact that many people don't like watching silent films since they lack the presence of sound, many have come to believe that silent films are too old-fashioned, too theatrical, and just plain old boring to watch when they're compared to the new movies being released on a weekly basis. Although many people…show more content…
By mimicking Leroux's words, Julian Rupert directed a film that tells the story of the mysterious, masked, and deformed Phantom who lives and lurks inside the sewers beneath the Paris Opera House in the 1890s. In addition, Rupert conveys the story of young Christine Daaé, a rising opera singer who learns that both her secret admirer and teacher of music is the mysterious Phantom. Through acts of mayhem and murder, the Phantom intends to win Christine’s love, while at the same time, secure her the leading vocalist spot at the Opera House. However, the Phantom’s love story takes a turn when Christine vows to flee Paris with her true love, Raoul de Chagny, in order to escape the Phantom’s hold. Once the Phantom learns of these plans, on the night in which they are supposed to be acted upon, he takes Christine captive, holds her as prisoner, and demands her to accept his love. In order to save his love from her kidnapper, Raoul sets off on a rescue mission. Although it's not an easy task, Raoul puts an end to the Phantom's plans and rescues…show more content…
Since there are a limited amount of inter-titles in the film, one must constantly and carefully examine the expressions of the actors. Although there were times in which the acting seemed like it was a little bit over dramatic, especially after Christine ripped off the Phantom’s mask, and she stumbled all over the ground like a drunk person, but, it told the story. If there were no facial expressions and/or gestures in this movie, one would absolutely be confused. In addition, the imagery in the movie allowed the audience to feel like they were in the Paris Open House and sewers beneath. From the creepy and eerie coffin in the Phantom’s bedroom to the dazzling and enormous chandelier in the heart of the Opera House imagery played a huge role in this production. In addition, filmmakers tinted the masquerade ball scene (the only colored scene in the film) to hint of the great celebration taking place and the steady, but fastly approaching climax. Furthermore, filmmakers used music to play to the audience's emotions and to give them a sense of what was happening during the scenes. For example, an orchestra would play soft and slow beats of music to express sadness, like when Christine told Raoul she could never see him again, and fast, deep beats of music, like when the Phantom showed up at the masquerade ball and later when the dead body of Joseph Bouquet is
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