Importance Of Socialization In Education

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SOCIALIZATION Socialization is the way through which people obtain the knowledge, language, social skills, and values to comply with the norms and roles required for integration into a community or group. This is the recognition of the importance of the schools in moulding students for social life. Teachers are one of the most people who influences the philosophy and lessons of socialization. By educating and modelling socialization to the learners they will learn the meaning of generosity and kindness. They will then be able to go out into society and contribute in a productive, meaning and positive way. Teachers are the outside providers of the child, a teacher’s facilitation role is very important in a learner’s life. E.g. a teacher has…show more content…
Thin socialization takes place in the classroom where detailed learning and instructions takes place. Here a learner is said to be socialised when he or she is introduced to intentional instruction by the teacher, these instructions include obtaining forms and terms of knowledge such as learning business studies. Once a learner has mastered the different subject has different discourses, that learner is said to be socialised. Thin socialisation also take place whereby teacher set rules and give instructions to the learners, e.g. a teacher ask learners to sit in pair and write their SWOT in the exercise book. Thick socialization outside the classroom, here learners obtain attitudes, norms and beliefs often unintentionally by being socialized with others. This may occur during school trips, sporting activity, peer activities. Thick socialization is often accidentally and hard to…show more content…
A person can be indoctrinated into believing something that is true, e.g. when a business studies teacher threaten a learner on pain of punishment to believe that there are 8 business functions. This content is true but because a learner has been force to learn, he or she has been indoctrinated. However, according to Barrow (1981) the limits are, it does not recognise the role of force in obtaining the beliefs from the start. He also state that indoctrination is not about what a person believes, but how those beliefs are acquired in the first place. Indoctrination and socialization might become possible to confuse them, they both emphasise the importance of the beliefs in question. Barrow (1981) insists that the contrast between socialisation and indoctrination can be justified on at least three grounds: • Indoctrination is about beliefs, whereas socialisation is. Socialisation is concerned about weaker conception of belief, such as acclimatising people with existing practices. • Indoctrinating a person includes hurting that person in one way or another. Socialisation in contrast, aims at assisting students find their place in society by learning social rules. • Indoctrination includes the use of threats and force imposed on a subject by whatever means. However, socialization relies on some notion of rationality aimed at increasing understanding and participation in
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