In Flanders Fields Poetry Analysis

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Approximately ten million men died fighting in World War 1. Nothing can quite capture the horrific, putrid scenes, lingering guilt, and heavy memories of these hellish seven years as well as poems have. John McCrae, Laurence Binyon, Wilfred Owen, and Siegfried Sassoon are just several of the poets who have endured the war and lived to write of its horrors. They all use metaphorical descriptions and imagery to depict their grief and respect for those who’ve died. The poems selected have left their readers in remembrance and grief over what has happened over 50 years ago. This first poem, In Flanders Fields, is a poem written by John McCrae. His views through his poem show obvious grief. Unlike the other poems I’ve mentioned in this essay, In…show more content…
This makes the audience never forget the young souls that went into battle. In this poem, he has made a tribute to all the lost soldiers. England is personified as a mother who grieves for her children. “Fallen in the cause of the free” shows that they died for a noble cause, even so, “there is music in the midst of desolation”. The depiction of the third stanza shows us that the men were brave, young, and “straight of limb”. They kept their courage even by the sight of death. The fourth stanza is probably the most memorable. In this stanza, Binyon leaves us with the same remembrance as Sassoon’s Aftermath: that they shall not be forgotten. In addition, he also mentions how they will not grow old. The similarity between Sassoon’s remembering them at the “green of the spring” is parallel to “at the going down of the sun in the morning”. Later in the poem, Binyon uses more imagery of the ‘fallen’ soldiers. He talks of how they are gone and they no longer get to laugh with their comrades, sit with their families, or work in the day-time, but “sleep beyond England’s foam. Later he says how they are known in their homeland as the stars are in the night (Binyon). In concluding, he finishes the poem by saying that when we look up at the stars we will remember them. We will die, and turn to dust. The world will continue as it does, but they will not be forgotten; they will not die. Binyon’s point leaves with his audience a feeling of…show more content…
He shows deploring violence in the beginning, but later in the poem is calmer and gloomier. He is lamenting the dead of the young boys that fought in the war. In addition, he uses graphic descriptions that emphasize how horrid the war atmosphere was. From the hideous noises of guns with “monstrous anger” and “rapid rattles” of the rifles to the exasperation felt for the youth “who die as cattle” and “in their eyes shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes”, Owen depicts how much he despised the war. He mourns the undignified death of the youth, like animals in a slaughterhouse, in the first two lines. The next couple lines tell of how they will not get rituals, prayers, or a “voice of mourning” because of their deaths. Instead, they get the sounds and rattles of rifles, the wailing of falling shells, and the sad bugles wailing from their homes. The rest of the poem transitions into grieving over the “doomed youth”. For example, he seems consolatory towards the fact that they will have no candles lit for them; instead the glow will be in their eyes. They will not have coffins covers or flowers. The paleness in the faces of girls will be their coffin covers, and their flowers will be the “tenderness of patient minds”(Owen). Owen finishes the poem with the finality that death is inevitable just as dusk is inescapable. Owen writes in a manner that makes his sorrow and rage contagious to the
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