Psychoanalytic Approach In Psychology

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at people have no free will. That behaviour is determined from environment or early childhood. It ignores biological factors, that hormones could affect how a person behaves. Through the female menstrual cycle, the dip in oestrogen and progesterone can dramatically change the female behaviour. Which would not be caused by the environment but hormone level. There are also some strong ethical criticisms of animals being used in experiments. Animals cannot give consent to participate in these experiments, an animal cannot express, in the same way as humans what the implications are from the experiments. The biologists would argue that animals and humans are essentially different. According to The Difference between (2012) “Human mind has gained…show more content…
If the therapist did not agree with certain things from a client was saying they might try to convince the client that their real feelings are just being repressed. Which could cause unnecessary upset and offend the client, especially if these feelings are real to the client. In contrasting views the psychoanalytic approach has some strengths. It emphasises on the unconscious –mind where others fail to do so. Freud created a talking therapy which became quite popular. People became interested in the unconscious-mind. It also gained a lot of genuine interest in talking therapy to help people with mental disorders. The humanistic approach is developed in America, in the 1960`s and became popular for its individualistic approach. Which has contrasting views from the behaviourist and psychoanalytic approach’s, humanistic approach believes in free will and individuals different opinions. It gained credibility for its belief, that to gain a greater understanding of psychology, research should be applicable to humans rather than other animals. (Talman 2010) Maslow’s, the pyramid approach, the hierarchy of need became one of the strengths of the humanistic approach. People in society today can relate to this approach. They can understand that you could not self-actualise if you were homeless. Basic needs would have to be met…show more content…
It combines theories like social learning theories and cognitive neuropsychology. The cognitive approach has several strengths and sparked a great interest in the study of memory. It likens the brain to a computer to show how memory is stored. In 1956, when George Miller published his “magic number 7 plus or minus 2”. This provided evidence of an adult`s short-term memory and that adults can remember seven things plus or minus two. This theory has been “supported by evidence from various studies such as Jacobs (1887)” (McLeod 2009). According to Atkinson and Shiffen (1971) short term memory on last for about fifteen to thirty seconds, that rehearsal was needed to store into long term memory. The use of the cognitive approach became popular with the educational system. A swizz biologist, Jean Piaget` theory has been applied in classrooms. It concentrates on how children learn, at different stages of development: at the age 2-7 they learn through language and development and children at the age of 7-11 should be capable of solving hands on problems logically. The National Curriculum has applied this to the educational system, using learning through play. (The National Curriculum
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